Vizio e series

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Vizio has long been known as the epitome of affordable TVs that deliver consistent (if, at times, underwhelming) performance for customers, with its E-Series leading the charge as its vanguard.

To up the ante for the series in 2018, Vizio is packing in several new features - like smart assistant integration and ATSC tuners, alongside a bump up in local dimming zones - while remaining at a price that's affordable for most folks.

The problem that we saw during our limited hands on time with the TVs was that the E-Series still didn't deliver cutting edge performance: black levels certainly could've been better, while the limited viewing angle makes this less of a living room TV that's shared between the whole family and more appropriate for an apartment or dorm room.

Vizio's E-Series comes in sizes ranging from 43" to 80" and all 2018 4K models have HDR 10, HLG and Dolby Vision HDR content viewing - so it's not all bad.

Design

Overall, the 2018 E-Series design is traditional and very simple.  Its black bezel is wider than almost all of Vizio's other models - but it doesn't call much attention to itself like some of its silver or aluminum brushed counterparts from Samsung or LG might.  

The feet on either side of the TV are at an angle similar to a spread out slanted upside down "V." This is something you should consider if your furniture is narrow or shorter than the TV size being purchased. While this may seem like a poor design decision, Vizio told us that both the position and type of feet are requirements of the government to protect children from having the TV tip over on them.

For fans of over-the-air broadcasts, ATSC tuners were added back in to all models in 2018 which is significant to those who do not subscribe to cable or satellite, allowing you to snag those over-the-air HD signals for free.  

One major pain point with the E-Series is that Vizio's SmartCast OS is a bit too similar to 2017 and, ultimately therefore, is weak in its offerings.  

Fortunately, though, having Chromecast built-in is a plus and Vizio tells us that an app for YouTube TV is coming soon.

New for 2018 is the Alexa and Google Assistant integration. These smart assistants will allow you to stream content using voice control - but through those products, not through the TV itself.  

If you've never used a smart assistant in the past, Alexa will turn on the TV, turn off your lights, lock your door, etc... while Google Assistant will allow users to stream content directly using voice control.

Performance

In terms of performance, the E-Series packs full array backlighting and up to 16 zones of local dimming with up to 400 nits of peak brightness (up from 2017's 350 nits).  Though, it's worth noting that the 65" has just 12 zones of local dimming - which can make for less-than-stellar images.

HDR10, HLG and Dolby Vision HDR content is supported in the 2018 E-Series and Clear Action 240 aids fast-moving scenes with powerful image processing and a 120Hz refresh rate in a 60Hz TV.  

Vizio uses a mix of IPS and VA panels in the E-Series without specifying which models have which panel.  The VA panels usually distribute better quality contrast and image quality as compared to the IPS panels - so make sure to check the specs before you go all in on one.

All inputs on all of the models have been upgraded to HDCP 2.2/HDMI 2.0 allowing more HDR devices to be directly connected to the TV.  Inputs, of course, vary by the size of the display with the majority of screens offering three HDMI-In ports.

Early verdict

All said, the E-Series remains Vizio's stalwart budget option. It's not likely to win any awards for its performance in 2018 - but, as a trade-off, it's unlikely to do any lasting damage to your wallet. If you're after an affordable 4K TV, this is it.

That said, the features included in these models are uncommon in an entry-level display - especially the full-array back lit panel and SmartCast OS. In spite of some decent features, however, the TVs don't produce deep blacks or a fantastic picture.    

To that point, if you're planning on purchasing a larger E-Series screen, we'd  suggest you shell out a bit more for the upgraded M-Series model that offers deeper blacks and a better-quality picture which is noticeable to the naked eye.

Prices - Vizio E-Series E65-F0:▼

Linda Moskowitz is a Freelance Writer at TechRadar.com. Formerly at Consumer Reports & Tech50+

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Sours: https://www.techradar.com/reviews/vizio-e-series-e65-f0e55-f1

Vizio E Series (2017) TV Review

Pros

  • Full-array local dimming

  • 4K resolution and HDR support

  • Good picture quality

Cons

  • Not the best-looking design

  • The HDR could be better

  • Frustrating SmartCast setup process

Case in point: In 2014, this meant putting LED backlights across the entire screen, a performance upgrade previously reserved for very expensive TVs; the next year, Vizio bumped the series to 4K (UHD) resolution; and last year, the TVs all got "Smart Cast," Vizio's proprietary form of Google Cast. This year, the 2017 E Series gets the best upgrade of all: High Dynamic Range, or HDR.

Despite the stacked resume—4K resolution, HDR compatibility, smart casting, and full-array LEDs—the 2017 E Series(available at Amazon) once again starts at very affordable prices, with the 50-inch debuting under $500. There are cheaper TVs, sure, but that's still a heck of a bargain. It's not perfect, though, and there are some sacrifices that may make a more expensive model a better choice for HDR fanatics.

The 2017 Vizio E Series is available in nine screen sizes, with slightly difference specifications between them:

• 43-inch (Vizio E43-E2), $400 — no HDR
• 50-inch (Vizio E50-E1), $470 — no HDR
• 55-inch (Vizio E55-E1), $550 — HDR compatible
• 60-inch (Vizio E60-E3), $750 — HDR compatible
• 65-inch (Vizio E65-E0), $900 — HDR compatible
• 70-inch (Vizio E70-E3), $1,300 — HDR compatible
• 75-inch (Vizio E75-E3), $2,000 — HDR compatible
• 80-inch (Vizio E80-E3), $3,400 — HDR compatible

We bought and reviewed a 2017 55-inch E Series, so the findings in this review should apply to the 55-, 60-, 65-, 70-, 75-, and 80-inch to a degree, but will not represent 1:1 parity with the smaller, non-HDR compatible sizes. In the 50- and 43-inch sizes, you don't get HDR compatibility.

While it's not a huge issue, the E Series only has one HDR-compatible HDMI input, something buyers should be aware of.

Credit: Reviewed.com / Lee Neikirk

There's also the issue of zone count and VA versus IPS panel types. Because each of the 2017 E Series models use FALD (full-array local dimming), the efficacy of their picture quality is highly dependent upon the "zone count," or how many independently controllable LED zones the backlight uses. Traditionally, FALD TVs are very expensive, but the E Series' claim to fame is delivering FALD at affordable prices. However, to do this, Vizio usually expends the minimum possible amount of effective FALD zones. While a flagship FALD-equipped TV might have hundreds of zones, the E Series traditionally has somewhere around 12.

Each of the E Series TVs delivers four HDMI inputs, as well as component/composite and USB inputs. Note that none of the E Series displays have internal tuners, and thus you won't get a coaxial/RF jack here. It's also worth noting that only one HDMI input (HDMI 1) is HDMI 2.0 compatible.

Con: Not too easy on the eyes

One major mainstay of Vizio's E Series that seems to never change? The design. Every year, the E Series look about the same: plain black chassis, stand, and bezels, where by far the most interesting "design" element is the screen. The 2017 version isn't breaking any molds, either. However, this is only a con if you want a particularly handsome TV. If you'd rather not pay for extraneous looks, the E Series' affordability is due in part to how plainly/simply it is designed.

With its black bezels, black caltrop feat, plasticky finish, and thick profile, the E Series isn't going to win any awards for design. But that's okay.

Credit: Reviewed.com / Lee Neikirk

Pro: For general viewing, the picture quality is quite good.

Like previous E Series TVs, the 55-inch 2017 model gets the job done in a pinch. Its full-array local dimming may be a bit coarse (more on that in a second), but overall it does achieve the intended effect of increasing the E Series' contrast (the darkness of its shadows and brightness of its highlights).

Using the standard ANSI checkerboard and the Calibrated Dark mode, I measured an average black level of 0.03 with a reference brightness around 125. This gives the E Series a contrast ratio around 4,200:1, which is great for this price/pedigree.

Overall, the E Series carries on the tradition of delivering notably good picture quality for its price range. (note: HDR content pictured)

Credit: Reviewed.com / Lee Neikirk

Con: When is an HDR TV not an HDR TV?

This isn't the first time I've had this complaint and it won't be the last, but buyers need to understand the various ways in which High Dynamic Range (HDR) matters and doesn't matter. While a TV doesn't need to be super bright and colorful for viewers to benefit from the on-board HDR-enabling tech, it's not unreasonable to expect that your "high dynamic range" TV have, you know, more dynamic range than what you're used to seeing. If a TV is going to promise more brightness and a greater range of colors, it needs to deliver.

Your E Series may not stream HDR content yet, but a firmware update is on the way.

Because it's a FALD-equipped model, it has the capability to get fairly bright without introducing unsightly edge-bleed or flashlighting, but it simply doesn't. Its color production range, while definitely good enough for the majority of non-HDR content, lacks the punching power to really drop any jaws. While this isn't a blemish against the TV necessarily, it's something buyers (and HDR fans) should keep in mind: you're not going to be super-duper impressed by Blu-ray HDR here, though it does look very good.

The E Series isn't the most impressive HDR TV on the market, but HDR Blu-rays still look good, even if they aren't jaw-dropping.

Credit: Reviewed.com / Lee Neikirk

The other issue is HDR streaming. We purchased our model and at its current firmware version, it couldn't stream HDR content. In this price range, that's a bit of an issue. Unless you already own an expensive HDR Blu-ray player, or a newer game console like the Xbox One S, streaming HDR via apps like Netflix and Amazon Video are your best bets to experience the upper echelon of content.

We spoke with Vizio, however, and the company confirmed that a firmware update is on the way to allow for HDR streaming. To prove it, the company pushed the firmware update directly to our E Series model via the serial number, enabling HDR streaming from Netflix, Fandango, and VUDU. And indeed, after the update I was able to stream Marco Polo in HDR on the TV. Eureka!

Con: Smart Cast seems like such a good idea on paper.

When Vizio announced the "Smart Cast" platform last year, we were pretty excited. The company's Google cast-based platform saw the 2016 M Series and 2016 P Series shipping with included Android tablets. This is because Vizio's "Smart Cast" lineup requires a second screen device to be controlled or used at all.

The E Series can't be set up without the presence of a second screen device.

The 2017 E Series is in the same boat. Right on the back of the TV near the power cord, there's a sticker warning users that they won't be able to set up/use the TV without a second screen device. While the 2017 E Series does include a remote control, the intention is that you'll operate it entirely via a smartphone or tablet. And on paper, this sounds great. It makes it much easier to do things like type in your WiFi password, and you can cast any Google cast-compatible app straight to the screen.

Vizio's SmartCast app is an innovative addition—when it works. Half the time, it may seriously frustrate you.

Credit: Reviewed.com / Lee Neikirk

However, in practice, using the SmartCast app is a bit of a hassle. Setting up and updating our E Series sample proved to be a longer process than setting up a non-Smart Cast TV due to disconnects between the app and the TV. Essentially, I had to go through the entire setup process twice due to the app completely forgetting the connection that had been established.

Con: No built-in tuner means no coaxial devices.

One interesting thing about the E Series is that the TVs don't contain built-in OTA tuners. That means they don't have a coaxial/RF input, and you won't be able to tune to over-the-air or digital channels, nor use an external antenna or satellite. While this doesn't mean you can't use a cable box with an HDMI or component output to watch cable, it does mean the TV itself primarily cannot be using for "tuning." Not a huge con in 2017, but something buyers should be aware of.

You can't use any device requiring a coaxial or RF input—the TV doesn't have one.

Pro: For a low zone count, this is the best local dimming I've seen in a while.

Something I noticed that's a real feather in the 2017 E Series' cap (or at the very least, the 55-inch we tested): this is some of the best local dimming I've seen on a TV that purportedly only has 12 dimming zones. Whether I was looking at complex test patterns or actual content, the E Series never once showed a hint of unsightly blooming or coarse transitions. Kudos, Vizio.

For having such a low zone count, the 2017 E Series does an excellent job avoiding the usual blooming/flashlighting or slow dimming zone movements of its forebears. (HDR content pictured)

Credit: Reviewed.com / Lee Neikirk

Con: As usual, better contrast comes at the cost of a limited viewing angle.

The big advantage to VA-panel based LED/LCD TVs with full-array local dimming (almost regardless of zone count) is that, during head-on viewing, they typically deliver much deeper/richer shadow tones and black levels than non-FALD counterparts. The downside? That efficacy falls off quickly during off-angle viewing, making for limited horizontal viewing angles.

Case in point: I measured a viewing angle that dropped to 16% of the head-on contrast value at just ten degrees off angle. More plainly, that means you have a very limited cone of viewing from anywhere besides directly in front of the TV. You get a few feet, enough for two or three people, but we'd strongly recommend against trying to spread out around a room or wall-mounting the E Series.

Pro: At the end of the day, HDR content still looks good.

We've established that the E Series has some red flags when it comes to referring to it as an HDR TV. At the time of this review, most E Series TVs can't stream HDR content, and it's not much brighter or more colorful than a non-HDR set—I measured peaks below even 300 nits, which most non-HDR TVs can do just fine.

Occasionally, red/yellow/orange content looks a bit skewed, especially the many skin tones in Gatsby, but overall the E Series does a lot of good with the relatively limited palette it boasts.

Credit: Reviewed.com / Lee Neikirk

But I have to hand it to the E Series, despite its technical shortcomings where brightness is concerned, it looks great. This may be a credit to the mastering of HDR discs, but I was impressed. The E Series only has one HDR-friendly HDMI input, so make sure you get the right one before judging on your own.

But suffice to say, despite its 60 Hz refresh rate and limited performance ability, the HDR content I watched looked balanced, bright, aptly colored, and attractive. The E Series does a very good job with what ability it does have to expand on the light/color space of its standard dynamic range performance, and (unless you're comparing it to a much more expensive HDR set) won't disappoint.

Despite its handful of shortcomings, HDR off of HDR Blu-rays looks good here, even if it's not as bright/colorful as on other models.

Credit: Reviewed.com / Lee Neikirk

Yes—just be aware you aren't getting the "cutting edge"

On paper, the E Series checks off a lot of the right boxes. It's a 4K/HDR/smart TV with a flashy new "Google cast" system that uses your second screen device as a remote. How futuristic!

In reality, SmartCast is sometimes a pain in the butt—not to mention the app likes to randomly pop up and give you the status of the TV when you're away from it, and sometimes won't connect at all when you're right next to it. The E Series is also not the heaviest hitter from a brightness/color volume standpoint (we expect the 2017 M and P Series will change that).

That said, for the things you are getting—the 55-inch gives you 4K resolution, the ability to enjoy HDR content, and smart functionality that is fine when it works—it still feels like a serious deal for the asking price of $550. The series again lives up to its reputation, and we imagine it's going to make an excellent choice for many TV lovers.

Meet the tester

Lee Neikirk

Lee Neikirk

Editor, Home Theater

@Koanshark

Lee has been Reviewed's point person for most television and home theater products since 2012. Lee received Level II certification in TV calibration from the Imaging Science Foundation in 2013. As Editor of the Home Theater vertical, Lee oversees reviews of TVs, monitors, soundbars, and Bluetooth speakers. He also reviews headphones, and has a background in music performance.

See all of Lee Neikirk's reviews

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The Vizio 65-inch E-Series E65-F1 ($729) is Vizio's entry-level 4K TV, offering smart TV functionality and HDR support for a fairly affordable price. That puts this TV somewhere between the extreme budget-friendly models that sell for under $500 and the premium sets that go for $1,000 or more. Vizio manages to deliver a solid product and a reasonable value.

Editor's Note: (2/13/2020) If you've got the Vizio E-Series E65-F1, you're probably due to refresh the software. Check our guide to learnhow to update your Vizio TV to the latest version of SmartCast.

Vizio 65-inch E-Series E65-F1 Cheat Sheet: What you need to know

  • For a reasonable price, you get solid HDR performance and support for Dolby Vision.
  • Vizio's SmartCast platform offers built-in Chromecast for wide app support, but it provides very few local apps.
  • Local dimming is rarely seen in this price range, and the E65 does it pretty well.
  • Picture quality is great, with a wide gamut and accurate color.
  • Audio quality is good but not great. We recommend adding a soundbar.
  • Some may be disappointed by the lack of voice interaction, but you can add it with a Google Home or an Amazon Echo.

Vizio 65-Inch E-Series E65-F1 Specs

Price$729.99
Screen Size65 inches
Resolution3840 x 2160
HDRHDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision
Refresh Rate60 Hz
Ports4 HDMI, 1 USB
Audio2 channels, 10 watts
Smart TV SoftwareSmartCast with built-in Chromecast
Size57.9 x 33.4 x 3.4 inches [w/o stand]
Weight55.45 pounds [w/o stand]

The Vizio E65 has a fairly decent design for a budget TV, with relatively narrow, 0.6-inch-wide bezels and a stripe of metal accenting the bottom edge of the cabinet. The cabinet measures 57.9 x 33.4 x 3.4 inches and weighs 55.45 pounds.

Two black plastic feet attach at either end of the cabinet. The stand has a footprint of 50.6 inches wide and 11.5 inches deep. If you want to skip the stand and hang the TV on a wall, the E65 can be used with a 400 x 200-millimeter VESA mount.

Ports

The E65 has Vizio's combined right-facing and downward-facing connector panels, with the right-facing panel placed just a few inches in from the right-hand edge of the display. The design keeps all of the ports accessible, and the open design makes it substantially easier to reach the downward-facing ports in back.

On the right-facing panel, you will find one HDMI port, a single USB port, and component and composite video inputs. On the downward-facing panel, you'll find an additional three HDMI ports (including one with ARC support), for a total of four, which is a generous number for this price range.

The design keeps all of the ports accessible, and it's easy to reach the downward-facing ports in back.

There are outputs for digital surround sound and analog stereo sound, along with an RF connector for coax input. That feature was absent from Vizio's 2017 TVs, and its presence here makes the new Vizio a lot easier to recommend to anyone with a TV antenna, so this set should appeal to cord cutters.

MORE: The Best Streaming Video Services for Cord Cutters

An Ethernet port is there for wired internet connectivity, and the TV has 802.11ac Wi-Fi for wireless networking.

Performance

For a reasonable price, the E65 manages to offer a lot of the features you want in a 4K TV, including broad HDR support that includes both the standard HDR10 and HLG formats, but also Dolby Vision. The 65-inch display is reasonably bright and clear, with strong color reproduction and clarity.

On scenes from Spider-Man: Homecoming, the E65 not only produced vivid colors like Spider-Man's red and blue suit and the orange Staten Island Ferry, but it also handled darker scenes fairly well. A showdown between hero and villain in a dark warehouse managed to be appropriately shadowy while still providing good color to both Spider-Man and the Vulture.

MORE: Best Cheap 4K TVs (Under $500), Ranked from Best to Worst

Much of this performance can be attributed to the color gamut the display produces. In our testing, the E65 produced 99.2 percent of the Rec. 709 broadcast color standard. That score lands squarely between results from competitors like the TCL 6 Series 65-inch Roku TV (99.9) and the RCA 65-inch Roku 4K TV (98.5), but frankly, the differences between any two sets scoring above 99 percent are hard to detect without lab equipment.

Vizio 65-Inch E Series Benchmarks

Color Gamut (Percentage, Higher Is Better)Color Accuracy (Delta-E Rating, Lower Is Better)Max Brightness (Nits, Higher Is Brighter)
Vizio 65-inch E-Series E65-F199.21.4366
TCL 6 Series 65-inch Roku TV (65R617)99.91.1607
RCA 65-inch Roku 4K TV98.51.6275

Color accuracy is the other key component of picture quality, and the E65 had an excellent Delta-E rating of 1.4 (closer to zero is better). That makes this set one of the more accurate TVs you can get for under a thousand dollars. Again, the color accuracy seems to track right along with the price; the more expensive TCL 6-Series did slightly better (1.1), and the slightly less expensive RCA Roku TV did slightly worse (1.6). In actual viewing, you might see some slightly oversaturated shades of blue, but on the whole, color was highly accurate.

An unexpected aspect of the E65 is the inclusion of full-array backlighting and local dimming, features that are often reserved for more-expensive sets. The benefits of local dimming include deeper black levels and brighter highlights, making a set great for HDR content, but the best performance comes from several tightly focused dimming zones. The E65 has 12, and smaller sizes in the E-Series (up to 55 inches) have only 10. Compare that with Vizio's much more expensive 65-inch P-Series Quantum, which has 192 zones, and you'll have a better idea of how much Vizio scaled down this feature to keep the set within the midrange price where the E65 is targeted.

The backlight performance is pretty good for a basic set, but the E65 still has some issues with light blooms caused by imprecise backlight dimming. In heavily shadowed scenes from Blade Runner 2049, unwanted halos of light frequently interrupted the deep black shadows.

The E-Series' full-array backlighting and local dimming enable deeper black levels and brighter highlights, making this set great for HDR content.

The TV comes ready for 4K gaming, but don't expect expanded color support or HDR without some extra work. When we connected our Xbox One X, the TV automatically supported 4K resolution at 60 hertz, but 10-bit color and HDR gameplay were not supported. To get that added support, you'll need to adjust the input settings for whichever HDMI port is used to connect your game console, and enable HDMI 2.0 functionality. Where so many manufacturers enable these features by default, it's irritating to have to wade through settings menus for what should be standard functionality.

Audio

The E65 is outfitted with a pair of 10-watt speakers, which offer passable volume levels, but they may not get as loud as you expect when you turn the set up. In a climactic fight scene from Spider-Man: Homecoming, the mix of dialogue, sound effects and soundtrack music came through clearly.

With no subwoofer, the E65 doesn't produce much bass. On Daft Punk's "Around the World," the pronounced, bass-heavy beat lacked the heavy thumping quality it should have had.

For fuller, richer sound, we'd definitely recommend pairing the E65 with a soundbar to add volume and bass.

Smart Features

Vizio's SmartCast operating system is a blend of great features and limited capabilities. As smart TV platforms go, SmartCast has an extremely limited number of locally installed apps, with only 22 available. However, there are a lot more apps and pieces of content you can access via the TV's built-in Chromecast functionality.

Included on the TV are several popular subscription apps, like Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video and YouTube TV. You also get a handful of free streaming services, like YouTube, Crackle, Xumo and Pluto TV, as well as a Vizio-branded app called WatchFree.

Vizio's SmartCast has only 22 built-in apps, but you can access more via the TV's built-in Chromecast functionality.

The WatchFree app repackages streaming channels from Pluto TV, giving you several channels of movies, news and indie content presented linearly; you'll get what's on when it's on, and you won't be able to fast-forward, rewind or skip ads. The biggest problem with the app is simply that it pulls all of its content straight from Pluto TV, which is already installed on the TV.

MORE: Best Smart Speakers

The one feature that we wish the E-Series TV had is voice interaction. When you see sets from LG and Samsung, and even TCL's Roku sets, offering voice search and control, the lack of that functionality on the Vizio feels like an omission. As with the use of Chromecast to provide broader app support, you can still get voice control by pairing the TV with a Google Home or an Amazon Echo. The E65 is compatible with both.

Remote Control

Vizio's remote control is comfortable to hold thanks to a curved profile, and it does a decent job of letting you navigate through both smart TV menus and live TV channels with its square directional pad and standard channel controls. However, the design mounts the buttons flush with the body of the remote and has no backlighting to make it easier to use in darkened environments.

It's not the most exciting design around, but it gets the job done. In fact, our only substantial complaint with the design is the prominent placement of six preprogrammed app buttons. These controls provide instant access to popular and promoted services, specifically Amazon Prime Video, Crackle, iHeartRadio, Netflix, Vudu and Xumo. The placement of these buttons makes it a little harder to ignore these controls than on other remote controls.

Bottom Line

The Vizio 65-inch E-Series E65-F1 SmartCast TV manages to be a very solid value for a 4K TV, offering great picture quality and premium touches like local dimming and Dolby Vision support, all for a fairly affordable price. Vizio's SmartCast smart TVs may not be for everyone, with their mobile-first approach to apps and lack of built-in voice interaction, but if those aren't deal breakers, the E65 is a pretty great buy.

If you can afford it, though, it's worth stepping up to the TCL 6 Series 65-inch Roku TV. For that set's $999 price, you definitely get better picture quality, a better backlight with more dimming zones and a much wider selection of apps. But overall, the Vizio E65-F1 is a good 4K TV value.

Credit: Tom's Guide

Brian Westover is an Editor at Tom's Guide, covering everything from TVs to the latest PCs. Prior to joining Tom's Guide, he wrote for TopTenReviews and PCMag.
Sours: https://www.tomsguide.com/us/vizio-e-series-e65-f1,review-5894.html
Vizio E-Series E65-E1 Display - Hands On Review

I must confess. I don’t yet own a 4K TV. I’ve stared at them for countless hours in the office and at trade shows, but when it comes time to spend my own money, I haven’t pulled the trigger. And why should I? I’m still sitting cozy with a wonderful 2011 60-inch Panasonic Viera plasma HDTV that works beautifully and has some of the best picture quality possible for its resolution.

Throughout the years, TV makers have tried hard to get me to upgrade. First, 3D TVs (boy, that was a bust), then curved and high-resolution 4K sets, new screen types like LG’s beautiful OLEDs, now with retina-searing High-Dynamic Range (HDR)—which offers extra vivid colors and inky blacks. Right now, those fancy OLED HDR TVs from LG are the must-have TV, but they still cost $1,500 or more.

I still don’t think anything beats OLED, but the massive 65-inch Vizio E-Series set I’ve been using is winning me over to the 4K side. Vizio has made a name for itself by offering high quality TVs on the cheap, and the new E-Series is a prime example of this strategy at work. The 65-inch E65-E0 I’m using has a beautiful LED screen with a 4K Ultra HD pixel resolution (3,840 x 2,160 pixels), a full backlit screen with 12 local dimming zones (more on those soon), HDR10 for extra contrast, high-speed Wi-Fi AC, Bluetooth 4.1 support, built-in streaming apps that actually work pretty well, and Chromecast support, too.

These are high-end features you’d find on a $1,000+ TV like this excellent $1,700 Samsung Q7C. This option from Vizio is only $800. And, if you can sacrifice a few inches, the 55-inch set has the same specs for only $500—pretty extraordinary. Though, you’ll have to put up with one rather ridiculous omission. Technically, it isn’t a TV at all, but I’ll talk about that later.

A Highly Dynamic Picture

How good the picture looks will depend almost entirely on whether you’re watching (or playing) content filmed or made in 4K HDR, and there still isn’t a lot of it, to be honest. You’ll have to dig into Netflix’s Originals (and slightly upgrade your subscription) to get 4K. Amazon has some high-resolution video, and so does YouTube and Google Play Video. Gamers, you’ll need a PlayStation 4 Pro or Xbox One X. It’s rare enough that most things you’ll watch will still come in HD. Luckily, HD content still looks pretty damn nice on this set, too.

Today, I was particularly awed watching Netflix’s Fire Chasers documentary. The devastation and burning felt a lot more real in high resolution. Flames burned incredibly brightly, and the 12 dimming zones did a great job balancing those bright yellows and oranges with the deep blacks of the charred California forests in the aftermath of the fires. The realism did help me feel more connected than I think I might have.

Some TVs have lighting that comes in from the sides, but Vizio has a full backlight behind the screen for brightness (though it’s still a TV that may not be bright enough for a very well-lit room). That backlight has 12 zones where the TV can turn off or dim lighting to darken blacks in a particular spot on the screen. It’s a subtle trick, but the TV has better black levels because of it. And if you’ve ever seen an OLED TV, where every pixel can completely turn off if it’s black, you probably understand how important dark blacks are.

Vizio has also done a remarkable job eliminating the soap opera effect, which is that annoying, unnerving feeling that you’re on set or watching something that was filmed with an iPhone. It can make any movie or TV show feel cheap, like you’re watching a daytime soap opera. This happens on a lot of LED and LCD TVs with a 120Hz refresh rate, or higher. Usually, you can turn off the effect, but none of Vizio’s default picture-enhancing features seem to harm the quality much. The Calibrated mode in settings gave my 65-inch E-Series very nice, tuned color for my room.

Simple Streaming

No TV has fantastic streaming options, but I’ve found myself using some of the limited streaming apps included on the built-in ‘SmartCast’ menu. The basics are here, like Netflix, Amazon Instant Video, and Hulu, but I also enjoyed Xumo, which has some live TV channels, and a couple others. They’re a little laggy, and the Hulu app didn’t have the service’s new menu design yet, but mostly I’ve enjoyed using the apps. The built-in Chromecast support is also nice. I can cast shows from any app using my phone, and because I own a speaker with Google Assistant, I can yell out “Hey Google, play Black Mirror on TV” and on it comes—just like it might in an episode of Black Mirror, right before everything goes off the rails.

Of course, I do still recommend you get a Roku, though maybe not the Roku Streaming Stick+. I’ve had some trouble getting it to output 4K properly on this TV, and due to the shape of the back panel, long USB sticks don’t fit well in any of the 4 HDMI ports. I recommend you go with a new Roku Ultra instead.

Rabbit Ears Not Included

Not everything about this Vizio is perfect. Most notable is that it’s technically can't act as a traditional TV—there's no TV tuner built in, which is why Vizio calls it a “Home Theater Display.” If you want to use a [digital antenna (this is my favorite) to pick up local TV channels, you’ll need to buy an external TV tuner. I haven’t tested enough to tell you which is best, either, but they’re about $50. It’s not ideal, but if you’re a cord cutter that mostly just streams, like I do, it’s not as big a problem. Cable boxes should work fine.

The build quality also leaves something to be desired. It has thin bezels and looks excellent from the front, but the back has a cheap, plasticky look. You may also need to wall mount it or buy a new TV stand to fit this 3-inch thick, 50-ish pound display. Instead of a nice pedestal stand in the middle, Vizio TVs have two stubby legs on each side. The 65-inch E-Series is too wide to fit on almost any standard table, which is a good enough reason to consider the 55-inch and 60-inch models, though they aren’t much better.

Like most affordable TVs, the speakers in this Vizio aren't nice to listen to. You’ll want to pick up a soundbar or speakers of some kind. Naturally, Vizio sells a pretty good soundbar at a solid price.

Those gripes aside, the Vizio has E-Series models from 40 inches all the way up to 80 inches these days. We only recommend three sizes, though. The 55-inch, 60-inch, and 65-inch models offer all of the high-end perks at reasonable $500 - $800. The smaller versions lack features the quality local dimming and the larger sets are just too expensive. The Vizio E-Series are not the absolute greatest TVs you can buy (again, I point to LG's OLEDs), and they aren't quite the cheapest in their class, but when it comes to value, they’re just right.

Sours: https://www.wired.com/review/review-vizio-e-series-4k-tv-with-hdr-2017/

E series vizio

VIZIO SmartCast™ E-Series E55-D0 55" Class 1080p Full HD LED Smart TV

The new VIZIO SmartCast E-Series Home Theater Display brings your favorite entertainment into your hands. Download the VIZIO SmartCast App to turn your smartphone into the ultimate remote. With Google Cast built-in, you can tap to cast content from mobile apps you already know and love right to the E-Series. Experience stunning 4K Ultra HD picture quality and a powerful Octa-Core processor for a value truly unmatched.

The VIZIO SmartCast E-Series features up to 12 Active LED Zones® that adapt to your entertainment for blacker blacks and brighter brights.

8.3 million screen pixels in select models combine to form a radiant 4K Ultra HD picture for highly articulated details and piercing clarity in everything you watch.A full LED backlight grid spans across the entire display, synchronizing brightness levels to onscreen content for a more uniform picture.

Note: Television returns are subject to restocking fees in accordance with Dell return policy. See www.dell.com/returnspolicy

Tech Specs


Quick Specs


Product Type

LED-backlit LCD TV - Smart TV

Display Format

1080p (Full HD)

Motion Enhancement Technology

120Hz Effective Refresh Rate, Clear Action 240

Video Interface

Component, HDMI

Connectivity

Wi-Fi, LAN, Bluetooth

LCD Backlight Technology

LED backlight - full array, local dimming

Speaker System

2 speakers

Sound Effects

DTS Studio Sound

Remote Control

Standard remote

Power Consumption Operational

56 Watt

Power Consumption Stand by

0.5 Watt

Energy Consumption per Year

103 kWh

Dimensions (WxDxH) - without stand

48.8 in x 2.9 in x 28.3 in

Environmental Standards

ENERGY STAR Qualified

Manufacturer Warranty

1-year warranty

Product Type

LED-backlit LCD TV - Smart TV

Display Format

1080p (Full HD)

Motion Enhancement Technology

120Hz Effective Refresh Rate, Clear Action 240

Video Interface

Component, HDMI

Connectivity

Wi-Fi, LAN, Bluetooth

LCD Backlight Technology

LED backlight - full array, local dimming

Speaker System

2 speakers

Sound Effects

DTS Studio Sound

Remote Control

Standard remote

Power Consumption Operational

56 Watt

Power Consumption Stand by

0.5 Watt

Energy Consumption per Year

103 kWh

Dimensions (WxDxH) - without stand

48.8 in x 2.9 in x 28.3 in

Environmental Standards

ENERGY STAR Qualified

Manufacturer Warranty

1-year warranty

See more tech specsSee less

General


Product Type

LED-backlit LCD TV - Smart TV

Power Consumption Operational

56 Watt

Energy Consumption per Year

103 kWh

Sensors

Ambient light sensor (ALS)

Video Interface

Component, HDMI

Display


Display Format

1080p (Full HD)

Motion Enhancement Technology

120Hz Effective Refresh Rate, Clear Action 240

LCD Backlight Technology

LED backlight - full array, local dimming

Dynamic Contrast Ratio

2000000:1

Viewing Angle (Vertical)

178°

Display Menu Language

English, French, Spanish

Additional Features

V6 Six-Core processor

Stands & Mounts


VESA Mounting Interface

200 x 200 mm

Digital TV Tuner


Remote Control


Remote Control Model

VIZIO XRT133

Audio System


Sound Effects

DTS Studio Sound

Speaker System

2 speakers

Output Power / Total

20 Watt

Additional Features

Google Cast support

Speakers

2 x main channel speaker - built-in - 10 Watt

Network & Internet Multimedia


Functionality

Digital audio playback, digital photo playback, digital video playback, Internet video playback

Connectivity

Wi-Fi, LAN, Bluetooth

Connections


Connector Type

  • 2 x HDMI - bottom
  • HDMI - side
  • Network - bottom
  • Digital audio output (optical) - bottom
  • Component video input - side
  • Audio line-in - side
  • USB - side
  • Audio line-out - bottom

Environmental Standards


ENERGY STAR Certified

Yes

Power


Power Device

Power supply

Power Consumption Stand by

0.5 Watt

Estimated Annual Operating Cost

13 USD

Manufacturer Warranty


Service & Support

  • Limited warranty - parts and labor - 1 year
  • Technical support - lifetime

Dimensions & Weight Details


Dimensions & Weight Details

  • Panel without stand - 48.8 in x 2.9 in x 28.3 in x 32 lbs
  • Panel with stand - 48.8 in x 10.6 in x 30.7 in x 32.8 lbs

Dimensions & Weight (Shipping)


Height (Shipping)

32.5 in

Weight (Shipping)

42.33 lbs

General


Product Type

LED-backlit LCD TV - Smart TV

Power Consumption Operational

56 Watt

Energy Consumption per Year

103 kWh

Sensors

Ambient light sensor (ALS)

Video Interface

Component, HDMI

Display


Display Format

1080p (Full HD)

Motion Enhancement Technology

120Hz Effective Refresh Rate, Clear Action 240

LCD Backlight Technology

LED backlight - full array, local dimming

Dynamic Contrast Ratio

2000000:1

Viewing Angle (Vertical)

178°

Display Menu Language

English, French, Spanish

Additional Features

V6 Six-Core processor

Stands & Mounts


VESA Mounting Interface

200 x 200 mm

Digital TV Tuner


Remote Control


Remote Control Model

VIZIO XRT133

Audio System


Sound Effects

DTS Studio Sound

Speaker System

2 speakers

Output Power / Total

20 Watt

Additional Features

Google Cast support

Speakers

2 x main channel speaker - built-in - 10 Watt

Network & Internet Multimedia


Functionality

Digital audio playback, digital photo playback, digital video playback, Internet video playback

Connectivity

Wi-Fi, LAN, Bluetooth

Connections


Connector Type

  • 2 x HDMI - bottom
  • HDMI - side
  • Network - bottom
  • Digital audio output (optical) - bottom
  • Component video input - side
  • Audio line-in - side
  • USB - side
  • Audio line-out - bottom

Environmental Standards


ENERGY STAR Certified

Yes

Power


Power Device

Power supply

Power Consumption Stand by

0.5 Watt

Estimated Annual Operating Cost

13 USD

Manufacturer Warranty


Service & Support

  • Limited warranty - parts and labor - 1 year
  • Technical support - lifetime

Dimensions & Weight Details


Dimensions & Weight Details

  • Panel without stand - 48.8 in x 2.9 in x 28.3 in x 32 lbs
  • Panel with stand - 48.8 in x 10.6 in x 30.7 in x 32.8 lbs

Dimensions & Weight (Shipping)


Height (Shipping)

32.5 in

Weight (Shipping)

42.33 lbs
Sours: https://www.dell.com/en-us/shop/vizio-smartcast-e-series-e55-d0-55-class-1080p-full-hd-led-smart-tv/apd/a8822348
Vizio E Series LED TV Review

Vizio E-Series 2018 review: The cheapest TV with a home-theater-worthy picture

The secret is its full-array local dimming (FALD), which allows it to deliver better contrast and punch to pretty much every scene, but in particular in dark rooms. It beat the TCL 5 series Roku TV in our direct comparison, and I'm willing to bet it also outperforms other sets that lack local dimming. And that's pretty much every cheaper TV, and quite a few more expensive ones.

The E isn't perfect though. Its smart TV system can't hold a candle to Roku TV, and its styling is anything but stylish. For people who prioritize saving money first, picture quality second and everything else a distant last, however, none of those issues spoil the E-Series budget TV glory.

But first: avoid the 75-inch E75-F2

That's because some versions of that model use IPS-based ("in-plane switching") LCD panels instead of the VA (vertical alignment) panels used on every other size and model in the 2018 E series -- including the 65-inch model I tested. VA generally delivers superior contrast and black levels to IPS.

Here's Vizio's statement.

The E75-F2 is the only 2018 E-Series that is being developed with an IPS panel as well as a VA panel. End users will still be able to distinguish E75-F2 panels by the 4th digit in the serial number. A "2" represents a VA panel and a "J" represents an IPS panel, as follows:
LWZ2WYKT = VA panel
LWZJWYKT = IPS panel

If they want to avoid getting an IPS-based TV, 75-inch E series shoppers either need to check the serial number or just get the other 75-inch model, the E75-F1.

For the record, before this review first published Vizio had told me that the 50-inch model, E50-F2, used IPS panels as well. After the review published, Vizio emailed to say that it had given me the wrong information. Vizio's representative said that the E50-F2 does use VA panels.

To confirm that claim CNET purchased an E50-F2 and I found that, yes, its image quality is very similar to that of the original 65-inch review sample I tested. It does indeed appear to have a VA panel.

Start with the bad news: Design

I'll just come out and say it: The E-Series is the ugliest TV I've reviewed this year. You might not object to its angled bezel, glossy black plastic and the strip of silver running along the bottom, but you probably won't love it either. The frame around the image is still thin enough, thankfully, but even the ultrabudget TCL S405 looks nicer in my book.

I also dislike Vizio's many-buttoned remote, and I kept having to glance down rather than operate it by feel. I prefer the simplicity of TCL's Roku TV remote or the evolved clickers of Samsung and LG.

The second strike against it: Weak streaming

Cord cutters on a budget are one potential E-Series audience, and they'll likely boo its lackluster built-in streaming options. That's hardly a deal-breaker since you can always connect an external streamer like the Roku Streaming Stick Plus or, if you want Dolby Vision, an Apple TV 4K, but it's still a strike in the negative column compared to competitors like Roku TVs, Samsung and LG -- all of which have better smart TV implementations than Vizio.

The onscreen home page takes too long to load after you press the "V" button on the remote and once it does arrive, there's not much there. Just 20 apps appear along the bottom, and while a few are heavy hitters (Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, Vudu, YouTube, YouTube TV and Plex) the rest are minor, and it doesn't have plenty of other big apps like DirecTV Now, HBO, ESPN, CNN or Pandora. You can't remove or reorder apps, or in any way customize the Discover section, which occupies most of the screen with movies and shows you probably don't care about.

The system is great if you love using your phone instead of onscreen menus. The TV's Chromecast built-in system lets you go into any supported app on your phone and hit the Cast button to reveal the Vizio TV as an option; select it and video from the app will play back on the TV. There are thousands of supported apps, and the system works well in general, but I still prefer a real onscreen menu system -- just not Vizio's.

The WatchFree service is a new addition aimed at cord cutters who want free TV. It's a partnership with the Pluto TV free service and uses the same grid-style layout as a typical cable box. Most of the channels are from Pluto itself, with names like Failarmy and Adventure TV, or free feeds from online sources like Bloomberg and Cheddar. Even the familiar channels, like Fox Sports and something called "NBC News / MSNBC" aren't the same as those channels. There's a lot of free stuff there to watch, so it's tough to complain, but the Roku Channel does a better job in general of delivering free, ad-supported video.

Speaking of free TV, Vizio has finally addressed a glaring omission in past TVs: All of its 2018 sets include a built-in over-the-air TV tuner, just like those of competitors.

Although it lacks its own built-in voice assistant, the Vizio is able to be to controlled to some extent by Google Home (details here) and Alexa (here) smart speakers. I didn't test that functionality this time around, but Google Home worked relatively well to control the 2017 M-Series.

And now for the good: Cheap local dimming

Bringing FALD to lower price points is Vizio's wheelhouse, and for 2018 the E-Series is the cheapest Vizio with dimming. This feature is my favorite improvement for LCD picture quality because it improves all-important contrast and black levels, especially with HDR, and has better uniformity than edge-lit dimming. The number of dimmable zones is an important specification because it controls how precise the dimming can be. More zones doesn't necessarily mean better picture quality, but it usually helps.

Key TV features

Display technologyLED LCD
LED backlightFull array with local dimming
Resolution4K
HDR compatibleHDR10 and Dolby Vision
Smart TVSmartCast
RemoteStandard

The E-Series has 10 dimming zones on the 43-, 50- and 55-inch sizes, 12 on the 65- and 70-inch sizes, and 16 on the 75-incher. The M-Series ranges from 32 to 48 zones depending on size, which helps explain its superior image quality. Just a few zones are better than none, however.

The E-Series has a 60Hz refresh rate panel -- Vizio's claim of "120Hz effective" is fake news. So is Vizio's "Clear Action" spec, which it says is lower on the E-Series than the M series because "Thanks to the M-Series' greater panel brightness, the duty cycle can be lower, which offers greater motion clarity." Since you'll have to engage the dim, flicker-prone Clear Action setting to notice, however, that's not a big deal (see below for more).

The E-Series lacks a setting to engage MEMC (motion estimation, motion compensation), aka the Soap Opera Effect, as found on the TCL 5 series and Vizio's own P series. Like LG, TCL and Sony, Vizio supports both major types of HDR, HDR10 and Dolby Vision, in the E-Series.

  • 3 or 4 HDMI inputs (All HDCP 2.2/HDMI 2.0)

  • 1 component /composite video input

  • 1 USB port

  • RF antenna tuner input

  • Ethernet port

  • Optical digital audio output

  • Stereo analog audio output

The 43-, 50- and 55-inch sets have three HDMI, while the larger sizes get four. Unlike last year, all are state-of-the-art, capable of accepting the highest-bandwidth 4K signals. One also supports ARC.

Picture quality

In my side-by-side comparisons, the E-Series exhibited the best overall image quality at its price level. Spend a couple hundred more for an M-Series or the TCL 6 series and you'll see improvements, particularly with HDR, but at this price the E-Series stands above the rest.

Compared to the similarly priced TCL 5 series, which lacks local dimming, the Vizio delivered superior black levels and a more impressive image overall with both standard and HDR sources. The 5 series is technically brighter than the Vizio in accurate picture settings, but still not that bright overall, so between the two I'd still recommend the Vizio for bright rooms, too.

Click the image at the right to see the picture settings used in the review. Note that I did not perform a full calibration on the TCL 5 series, the Vizio E-Series or the TCL S405. Instead I used their best default dark-room settings for my comparison and tweaked light output when appropriate to level the playing field and provide a better comparison with the other sets that I did calibrate.

And one more note: I did not perform a full side-by-side comparison against other brands with the 50-inch E-Series sample CNET purchased, but I did compare it directly to the original 65-inch E-Series to confirm its image quality similarity. I also added some measurements I took of the 50-incher, where appropriate, and a few other details.

Dim lighting: Thanks to local dimming, the E-Series was a very solid performer in dark areas, despite its paltry number of dimming zones. Watching the Nigeria jungle fight from Chapter 2 of Black Panther, for example, the black of its letterbox bars, shadows and other dark areas looked (and measured) a pleasingly dark shade, trouncing the washed-out look of the TCL 5 series and S405. Black levels on the E were slightly worse (lighter) than on the Sony, the Vizio M and especially the TCL 6 series, but all of those sets are also more expensive.

Shadow detail, for example in the folds of the rebels' uniforms and the depths of the underbrush, was full and realistic, especially compared to the lighter TCLs. The Vizio did show some minor blooming in some areas, for example around the logo of my Blu-ray player's screensaver, but it was rare in normal video and definitely a worthwhile tradeoff for superior black levels and contrast.

Bright lighting: With both standard and HDR sources, the light output of the E-Series falls short of most HDR TVs I've tested. Its brightest modes beat the TCL 5 series and S405, but fall way short of higher-end TVs. Makes sense: it costs money to add brightness to an LCD.

In accurate settings -- Movie/Brighter for the TCL and Calibrated for the Vizio E -- the TCL outshines the the Vizio significantly; 284 nits to just 115. Tweaking the Vizio's settings (by increasing local dimming to Medium) bumps it up to 190, but the TCL is still brighter in the accurate settings I'd recommend. The 50-inch E had similar numbers as the 65-inch, albeit slightly dimmer.

Light output in nits

TVMode (SDR)10% window (SDR)Full screen (SDR)Mode (HDR)10% window (HDR)
Sony XBR-65X900FVivid1183696Vivid1203
Vizio M65-F0Vivid1035477Vivid1005
TCL 65R617Brighter/Vivid653480Brighter/Dark HDR824
Vizio E65-F1Vivid445352Vivid445
Vizio E50-F2Vivid422366Vivid420
TCL 55S405Brighter/Vivid301298Brighter/Dark HDR212
TCL 55S517 (5 series)Brighter/Movie284280Brighter/Dark HDR274

The Vizio E's screen was better than that of the TCL 5 series at reducing reflections.

Color accuracy: I didn't calibrate my E-Series review samples, but both still measured very well in the best settings. For the 65-inch size that's Calibrated Dark in a dark room and Calibrated in a brighter room.

For the 50-inch size, Calibrated is actually the best default picture mode no matter the brightness of the room. That's because Calibrated Dark was too dark at only 51 nits compared to a healthier 113 in Calibrated (although still well short of my target of 137). Gamma in Calibrated was closer to my dark-room target, and color measured better too.

The Vizio E delivered accurate color in program material, too. Natural areas, like the mountains, rivers and plains of Wakanda, looked pleasingly realistic, with more of a sunlit, dynamic look compared to the TCL. The Vizio E also showed a slight advantage in the warm African skin tones of Black Panther's crew, which looked a bit closer to the color reference Sony than the TCL delivered. All of the sets were quite accurate and color differences would be tough to spot outside of a side-by-side comparison.

Video processing: The Vizio E-Series handled 1080p/24 content properly, preserving the cadence of film, as long as its Film Mode setting was On (turning it off introduced excessive stutter). As usual the Clear Action setting improved motion resolution at the expense of reducing brightness and causing flicker, so I left it turned off. Unless you're really sensitive to blurring, you should too.

Input lag for gaming was minimal, measuring about 20.7 milliseconds with both 1080p and 4K HDR sources. With 1080p I got that result whether or not I engaged Vizio's Gaming Low Latency mode, but with 4K HDR the GLL setting had to be turned on for minimal lag; leaving it off increased lag to 65ms.

Uniformity: The screen of the E-Series was admirably free of bands and bright spots in test patterns, a marked improvement over the TCL 5 series. Off-angle viewing was average for an LCD, with similar washout and discoloration to the 5 series, albeit significantly better than the S405.

HDR and 4K video: As usual local dimming was even more important to getting the best image out of demanding HDR video. Watching Black Panther, the Vizio E trounced the TCL 5 series and the S405. Highlights and sun spots popped, dark areas maintained their deep contrast and everything looked more vibrant and alive. Colors on the Vizio E measured worse for HDR color gamut than the 5 series, but differences in program material, for example in the costumes of the dancers in Chapter 4, were tough to spot.

Comparing Dolby Vision, the 5 series kept up a bit better but still fell well short of the E. In Altered Carbon on Netflix, streamed from an Apple TV 4K, the Vizio still delivered a more dynamic image with brighter highlights and darker black levels, but the difference wasn't as drastic. Perhaps the improvement is due to Dolby Vision itself, but I'm guessing it's more about the content.

As much as the E-Series looked better than the similarly priced TCL 5 and cheaper S405, it fell well short of the HDR picture of the other sets, including the one-step-up M-Series and TCL 6 series. Both of those sets managed brighter, punchier highlights in all of the HDR video I compared, while doing a better job of containing blooming and maintaining deep black levels. HDR on the E-Series did look noticeably better than non-HDR material, but those other sets made the difference more dramatic and, dare I say, dynamic.

Geek Box

TestResultScore
Black luminance (0%)0.010Good
Peak white luminance (SDR)445Average
Default grayscale error1.51Good
Default color error2.64Good
Default color checker error2.0Good
1080p/24 Cadence (IAL)PassGood
Motion resolution (max)900Good
Motion resolution (dejudder off)300Poor
Input lag (Game mode)20.7Good



HDR10

Black luminance (0%)0.013Good
Peak white luminance (10% win)445Poor
Gamut % UHDA/P3 (CIE 1976)82.10Poor
Avg. color checker error8.86Poor
Input lag (Game mode, 4K HDR)20.70Good

Note: Since I did not calibrate this TV for the review, I'm including a shortened version of the standard Geek Box and reporting only the numbers for the best default setting: Calibrated Dark. See my picture settings notes above for more. The table above is for the 65-inch size. Measurements for the 50-inch size were largely similar.

Sours: https://www.cnet.com/reviews/vizio-e65-f0-review/

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