Boil cream target

Boil cream target DEFAULT

Skin Reactions to Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy

Targeted therapy and immunotherapy are more specific treatments than chemotherapy. They may cause different side effects from those usually linked with chemotherapy. Chemotherapy side effects usually include nausea, vomiting, weakness, and changes in blood counts. Targeted therapy and immunotherapy side effects may include skin, hair, nail, and/or eye problems.

What is targeted therapy?

Targeted therapy is a treatment that targets the specific genes, proteins, or the tissue environment that contributes to cancer growth and development. Some targeted therapies can cause specific side effects to the skin, hair, and nails. These side effects are caused by the effect of medications on the healthy growth of these tissues.

Targeted therapies that may cause skin problems

The following are some of the types of targeted therapies that may affect the skin. If your doctor prescribes a targeted therapy, ask what side effects to expect and how they will be treated.

  • Drugs that target EGFR. This common type of targeted therapy focuses on a molecule known as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR fuels the growth of cancer cells. It also plays a role in the normal growth of the skin, hair, and nails. This means rashes and changes to the hair and nails may occur during treatment with these drugs.

    Most people taking drugs that target EGFR develop a rash on their face and upper body. It usually happens within the first few weeks of taking these medications. You may notice redness or a warm sensation like a sunburn before the rash begins. After several days, pimples and pus bumps appear, and the surrounding skin feels slightly tender. Rashes are usually mild to moderate. But some people have severe rashes that cause major physical and cosmetic discomfort.

    The skin can also become very dry and itchy, interfering with daily activities and sleep. Skin on the fingertips may crack. Skin may also become more sensitive to sunlight. A lot of scratching can result in breaks in the skin. These openings make the skin more prone to infections. Inflammation around the nails can make grooming, dressing, and other activities painful or difficult.

  • Drugs that target VEGF. Another type of targeted therapy that may cause skin problems includes drugs that block a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This protein helps make new blood vessels. This group of drugs may also be called angiogenesis inhibitors because they block the formation of blood vessels. When these drugs affect the blood vessels in the hands and feet, they can cause skin problems.

Your health care team can help you manage these side effects so treatment can continue. Managing these side effects can also help avoid major changes to your skin, hair, and nails. It is important to note that the skin side effects linked with these drugs are not allergic reactions or infections.

Common skin-related side effects of specific targeted drugs

Below is a list of common targeted therapy drugs that can cause skin related problems.

  • Afatinib (Gilotrif), cetuximab (Erbitux), erlotinib (Tarceva), gefitinib (Iressa), osimertinib (Tagrisso), and panitumumab (Vectibix). These drugs may be prescribed for colorectal cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, and pancreatic cancer. Skin-related side effects include:

    • Acne-like rash on face and upper body

    • Inflammation around fingernails

    • Dry, itchy skin

    • Fingertip cracking

    • Hair loss on scalp

    • Increased, curly, or coarse hair on face and eyelashes

    • Increased sensitivity to sunlight

  • Lapatinib (Tykerb). This is used to treat breast cancer. Skin-related side effects include:

    • Sores on lips, mouth, or throat

    • Dry skin

    • Red, painful, numb, or tingling hands and feet

    • Rash

  • Sorafenib (Nexavar) and sunitinib (Sutent). This is used to treat renal cell cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), and hepatocellular cancer. Side effects include:

    • Hand/foot skin reactions (tender, thickened areas sometimes with blisters on palms and soles)

    • Redness and flaking on scalp and eyebrows

    • Warm, burning sensation on the face along with redness

    • Dry, itchy skin

    • Hair loss

  • Vemurafenib (Zelboraf). This is used to treat melanoma. Skin-related side effects include:

    • Red rash on the face and upper body

    • Bumpy, rough rash on arms and thighs

    • Hand/foot skin reactions

    • Skin growths, including non-dangerous skin cancers

    • More sensitivity to sunlight

  • Everolimus (Afinitor, Zortress) and temsirolimus (Torisel). These targeted therapy drugs are used for renal cell cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (a type of pancreatic cancer), and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (a benign brain tumor associated with tuberous sclerosis). Side effects include:

    • Mouth sores or canker sores

    • Bumpy rash on the upper body

    • Acne-like rash

  • Vandetanib (Caprelsa). This is used to treat medullary thyroid cancer. Side effects include:

    • Rash or acne

    • Dry, peeling, or itchy skin

    • Blisters or sores

    • Skin redness

What is immunotherapy?

Immunotherapy is also called biologic therapy. It is a type of cancer treatment that boosts the body's natural defenses to fight cancer. It uses materials made either by the body or in a laboratory to improve, target, or restore immune system function.

Many side effects are similar to those of an allergic reaction. They depend on the specific drug a person receives but may include skin, hair, nail, or eye problems.

Common skin-related side effects of immunotherapy

Below is a list of common immunotherapy drugs that can cause skin related problems.

  • Alemtuzumab (Campath). This medicine is used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Side effects include mouth sores.

  • Ipilimumab (Yervoy). This is used for melanoma. Skin related side effects include:

    • Bumpy red rash

    • Itching

    • Patches of pale skin and gray hair

  • Nivolumab (Opdivo). This medicine may be prescribed for renal cell cancer, NSCLC, and melanoma. Possible skin reactions include:

    • Hair loss

    • Yellowing of the skin and eyes

    • Itchy red rash

    • Blistering skin

  • Ofatumumab (Arzerra). This drug may be prescribed for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Skin-related side effects include:

    • Sudden reddening of the face, neck, or chest

    • Pale skin

    • Small, flat, round, red spots under the skin

    • Rash

    • Hives

  • Pembrolizumab (Keytruda). This drug may be used to treat NSCLC and melanoma. Skin-related side effects include:

    • Change in skin color

    • Yellowing of skin and/or eyes

    • Hair loss

    • Blistering skin

    • Itchy red rash

    • Flushing, or skin redness

  • Rituximab (Rituxan, Truxima). This drug is used for non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Skin-related side effects include redness, tenderness, swelling, or warmth of part of the skin.

Managing and relieving skin problems

Rashes, dry skin, and nail and hair reactions are rarely severe. But they can cause major discomfort. Patients may even want to stop cancer treatment because of these reactions. It is important to talk with your health care team about what to expect. Also tell your doctor as soon as you start feeling or seeing any side effects. There are early and effective treatments for these reactions.

The following suggestions may help avoid reactions and help relieve them if they do happen:

  • Before you begin treatment, talk with your health care team about the side effects. You may wish to talk with a dermatologist. A dermatologist is a doctor who specializes in skin conditions. Ask what to do if a rash or other problems appear. This may include how to get a prescription filled or the best way to see the doctor.

  • At the first sign of a reaction, tell your doctor or a dermatologist familiar with these reactions. Signs of a reaction include a warm or burning sensation, pimples, nail cracks, or dry skin.

  • Avoid the sun, and use a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15. If the sunscreen causes a burning sensation, you can try sunscreens that contain zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. Remember to use enough sunscreen. Apply more than half a teaspoon of sunscreen to each arm, your face, and your neck. Apply just over 1 teaspoon to your chest and abdomen, your back, and each leg. Re-apply sunscreen every 2 hours when outdoors, or more often if sweating or swimming.

  • Use a broad-brimmed hat if going outside. And avoid being in direct sunlight between 10 AM and 4 PM.

  • Use a mild soap in the shower. Avoid soaps with strong scents. Shower with lukewarm water and avoid long, hot showers. Also, avoid laundry detergent with strong perfumes.

  • Apply a cream-based moisturizer to all skin within 5 minutes of showering or bathing. Use hypoallergenic moisturizers that do not have perfumes or preservatives, such as Vanicream, Aveeno, CeraVe, Cetaphil, and Eucerin.

  • Avoid anti-acne skin products that have alcohol or retinoids. They can dry out your skin.

  • Your doctor may prescribe medicated skin creams for a rash. If the rash is severe or covers a large area of the body, you may need oral corticosteroids, such as prednisone (Rayos) or dexamethasone (available as a generic drug).

  • Antibiotics, usually taken for 2 to 4 weeks in pill form, are an effective therapy for rashes and nail tenderness.

  • Whenever there is discharge of pus, your doctor may take a sample of it to help choose the best antibiotic treatment.

  • For hand/foot skin reactions to sorafenib and sunitinib:

    • Use creams containing urea called carmol 20 or carmol 40, or salicylic acid (multiple brand names). Strong corticosteroids such as fluocinonide (multiple brand names) and clobetasol (multiple brand names) are also options.

    • Wear thick, comfortable socks and shoes, or try gel insoles. Also, do your best to protect against injury. Do not put too much weight on your hands and feet, especially during the first 2 months of treatment.

  • For itching in one specific area, called localized itching, apply a cream containing a corticosteroid or a numbing medicine, such as lidocaine 2% or cooling creams containing pramoxine, camphor, or menthol (multiple brand names for all drugs), several times a day.

    For more generalized itching or itching that affects sleep, talk with your doctor about taking an antihistamine pill, such as cetirizine (multiple brand names) or diphenhydramine (multiple brand names), as needed.

Related Resources

Skin Conditions

What You Need to Know About Immunotherapy Side Effects

What It's Like Taking Immunotherapy to Treat Cancer

ASCO answers; RashDownload ASCO's free Rash fact sheet. This 1-page printable PDF gives an introduction to rashes, including symptoms, how it is treated, ways to manage discomfort, words to know, and questions to ask the health care team. It also includes a tracking sheet to record when the rash started and where and how it appears. 

Sours: https://www.cancer.net/coping-with-cancer/physical-emotional-and-social-effects-cancer/managing-physical-side-effects/skin-reactions-targeted-therapy-and-immunotherapy

Bio-Oil Skincare Oil for Scars and Stretchmarks - with Vitamin A & E

  • IMPROVES APPEARANCE OF SCARS AND HELPS GET RID OF STRETCH MARKS - Clinically proven and dermatologist recommended to help repair skin damage and scars from pregnancy, surgery, injury, acne, C-section, aging, and more.
  • CAREFULLY FORMULATED, NATURAL BODY OIL - Vitamin E helps maintain healthy looking skin while natural Chamomile & Lavender Oil calm, soothe & cleanse damaged skin with anti-inflammatory protection. Unique Purcellin Oil reduces the thickness of the formula & makes application easy & absorption fast.
  • LOCKS IN ESSENTIAL HYDRATION WITHOUT CLOGGING PORES - Bio-Oil Skincare Oil is a uniquely formulated, non-greasy body oil that hydrates pure skin and helps retain essential moisture. Helps repair scars without clogging your pores.
  • HELPS SMOOTH UNEVEN SKIN TONES - This fresh skin care and dark spot corrector works naturally with the texture and rhythm of your skin to help improve the appearance of your uneven skin tones for light and dark skin.
  • FORMULATED FOR ALL SKIN TYPES - Helps soften skin and repairs damage for all types, tones, textures and areas of your skin.
  • Sours: https://www.target.com/p/bio-oil-skincare-oil-with-vitamin-a-38-e-4-2-fl-oz/-/A-12455924
    1. Bbc tv series
    2. Huge stuffed animals
    3. 2015 lexus is 300 horsepower
    4. Chain harvest shadowlands
    5. Program manager cisco salary

    Fusidic acid

    1. About fusidic acid

    Fusidic acid is an antibiotic.

    It's used to treat bacterial infections, such as skin infections including cellulitis and impetigo, and eye infections including conjunctivitis (red, itchy eyes).

    Fusidic acid is only available on prescription. It comes as a cream, ointment, or eye drops. It's can be combined with a steroid in some creams.

    It's also given by injection, as a liquid you swallow, or as tablets, but these are usually only used in hospital.

    2. Key facts

    • It's usual to use fusidic acid eye drops twice a day. It's usual to put on fusidic acid cream or ointment 3 or 4 times a day.
    • The most common side effects of fusidic acid eye drops are dry, sore, itchy or stinging eyes. You may also get blurred vision. It's unusual to get side effects with fusidic acid cream or ointment, but some people get skin irritation where they put it on.
    • Treatment with fusidic cream or ointment is usually for 1 or 2 weeks, although sometimes it can be for longer. You should use fusidic acid eye drops for at least 48 hours after you feel better and your eye looks normal.
    • Fusidic acid eye drops are called by the brand name Fucithalmic. Fusidic acid cream or ointment is called by the brand name Fucidin.

    3. Who can and cannot take or use fusidic acid

    Fusidic acid (cream, ointment and eye drops) can be used by most adults, including pregnant and breastfeeding women. Fusidic acid can also be used by children.

    Fusidic acid is not suitable for some people. To make sure fusidic acid is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction to fusidic acid or any other medicines in the past.

    4. How and when to use cream or ointment

    It's usual to put on fusidic acid cream or ointment 3 or 4 times a day. Check with your pharmacist or doctor if you're unsure.

    The difference between cream and ointment is that ointment is greasier.

    Your doctor will probably prescribe cream if you have a lot of infected skin to cover, and ointment for smaller infected areas.

    How to apply cream or ointment

    1. Remove the cap. Check the seal isn't broken before you first use the cream or ointment. Then push the spike in the cap through the seal on the tube.
    2. Always wash your hands before using fusidic acid cream or ointment. Unless you're using the cream or ointment to treat your hands, always wash your hands afterwards, too.
    3. Put a thin layer of cream or ointment onto the infected area and gently rub it in.
    4. Be careful to avoid your eyes if you use it on your face.

    If you accidentally get any medicine in your eye, wash it out with cold water straight away, then bathe your eye with eyewash if possible. Your eye may sting.

    If you start to have any problems with your sight or your eye is sore, contact your doctor immediately.

    If you have been told to cover the infected skin with any dressings or bandages, you may not need to use the medicine so often. Follow the advice of your doctor.

    Important: Fire warning

    Skin creams can dry onto your clothes and bedding. This makes them more likely to catch fire. Avoid naked flames.

    How long to use cream or ointment for

    Your skin should start to improve after a few days. But it's very important to use the cream or ointment for as long as your doctor has prescribed it.

    Treatment with fusidic cream or ointment is usually for 1 or 2 weeks, although sometimes it can be for longer.

    Important

    Carry on taking this medicine until you have finished the course, even if you feel better.

    If you stop your treatment early, the infection could come back.

    What if I forget to use it?

    If you forget to use fusidic acid cream or ointment, put it on as soon as you remember. Then continue to use the cream or ointment at the usual time.

    What if I use too much?

    If you accidentally put on too much cream or ointment – or if you get some in your mouth – it's unlikely to harm you.

    Talk to your pharmacist or doctor if you're worried, or if you or your child swallow a lot of the medicine.

    5. How and when to use eye drops

    Fusidic acid eye drops come as a gel in a tube. As the gel touches your eye it becomes runnier.

    It's usual to put 1 drop into your eye twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening.

    How to put eye drops in

    1. Take the cap off the tube when you're ready to use the medicine. It's important that the tip of the tube doesn't touch your eye. If the tip of the tube touches your eye, squeeze out 2 or 3 drops straight away onto some tissue and rinse the tip of the tube with salt water.
    2. Tilt your head back. Pull your lower eyelid down gently. Hold the tube over your eye and look up. Squeeze 1 drop into your lower eyelid.
    3. Close your eye for a minute or two and press gently on the side of your nose where the corner of your eye meets your nose. This helps to stop the drop draining away and keeps it in your eye.

    You might get some blurred vision straight after putting the drops in, but this should clear after a few minutes.

    If the eye drops are for a child, it might be easier to put the drops in while they're asleep or lying down.

    If you normally wear contact lenses, wear your glasses instead until your symptoms have completely gone.

    Wait for 24 hours after the last dose of eye drops before using your contact lenses again. The eye drops can damage some contact lenses.

    How long to use eye drops for

    Your eye should start to feel better within a few days.

    But it's very important to use the medicine for as long as your doctor has prescribed it. Even when your eye looks normal again, there may still be some bacteria in it.

    As a general rule, you should use fusidic acid eye drops for at least 48 hours after you feel better and your eye looks normal.

    This will help make sure that all the bacteria have been killed.

    Important

    Carry on using this medicine until you have finished the course, even if you feel better.

    If you stop your treatment early, the infection could come back.

    What if I forget to use them?

    If you forget to put the drops in, do it as soon as you remember. Then continue to use the drops at the usual time.

    What if I use too much?

    If you accidentally put too many drops in your eye – or if you swallow eye drops by accident it's unlikely to harm you.

    Talk to your pharmacist or doctor if you're worried, or if you or your child swallow a lot of the medicine.

    8. Pregnancy and breastfeeding

    It's generally safe to use fusidic acid cream, ointment or eye drops while you're pregnant or breastfeeding.

    If you're breastfeeding, take care when you put on fusidic acid cream or ointment.

    Make sure you do not accidentally get it on your breasts. If this happens, wash off any cream or ointment from your breasts before feeding your baby.

    Pregnancy and breastfeeding warning

    Tell a pharmacist or doctor if you're trying to get pregnant, are already pregnant or if you're breastfeeding.

    9. Cautions with other medicines

    There aren't any medicines known to cause problems if you take them at the same time as fusidic acid cream, ointment or eye drops.

    Important: Medicine safety

    Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you're taking any other medicines, including herbal medicines, vitamins or supplements.

    10. Common questions

    Sours: https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/fusidic-acid/
    7 Home Remedies for Boils - home remedy for boils

    .

    Cream target boil

    .

    7 Home Remedies for Boils - home remedy for boils

    .

    You will also like:

    .



    464 465 466 467 468