Nfl draft rankings

Nfl draft rankings DEFAULT

2022 NFL Draft: Top-5 Positional Rankings on Offense

NFL and College football is in full swing, and the countdown to the NFL draft has started. Even this early into the season, the draft is on the front of every prospect and NFL front offices’ mind. There’s a ton of game left to be played this season, but there’s plenty of players separating themselves from the pack. Let’s get into the top players across the offensive side of the ball for the 2022 NFL Draft.

Quarterbacks

Spencer Rattler, Oklahoma

One of the most polarizing players in college football, Spencer Rattler has put himself into the race for the first quarterback taken in the 2022 NFL Draft. Rattler’s tape is riddled with peaks and valleys, but the peaks are what make you excited for his potential as an NFL passer.

He’s a supreme arm talent paired with being a good athlete, the physical traits are undeniable for Rattler. However, the rocket launcher for an arm gets him in trouble by playing hero ball far too often. With more consistency in his playmaking, Rattler will be in the discussion for the No. 1 pick up until draft day.

Sam Howell, North Carolina

As a true freshman, Sam Howell emerged as one of the best pure throwers in the country. In the vertical passing offense North Carolina runs, Howell has made big throw after big throw for the past two seasons. Deep accuracy and ball placement have been huge focal points of Howell’s game.

Losing his top two pass catchers and two great running backs going into this season will hurt. Howell needs to show he can work with lesser weapons and become a quicker decision maker. His projection to the NFL is murky coming out of this offense, but the raw traits are there.

Carson Strong, Nevada

Carson Strong isn’t just another big arm, Mountain West quarterback, with some similarities to Josh Allen. Strong is an intriguing prospect in the 2022 NFL Draft. His powerful arm and size projects well in today’s NFL. However, he has ways to go mechanically as a passer similar to what Allen had to go through when transitioning to the NFL.

His lower half doesn’t sync well with his arm, and gets in trouble throwing with a lack of hip rotation. Strong is poised for another huge season, launching deep balls all over the field in this offense.

Matt Corral, Ole Miss

If you take away Corral’s game against Arkansas in 2020, he may be the best prospect in the class. However, that’s not the reality of Corral’s situation going into this season. His six interception game against Arkansas still lingers in the back of many fan’s minds.

The cold streaks in Corral’s game are concerning, but makes plays that get you out of your seat. One of the best pure throwers in this class, Corral can make off-platform throws at any angle. He’s got a full season ahead of him to make a jump in this class.

Malik Willis, Liberty

Close to the best athlete in this quarterback class, Willis is oozing with talent. It’s easy to fall in love with Willis’ game and the way he plays at Liberty. Arm talent and mobility makes him extremely dynamic and could be dangerous in the NFL.

However, there’s glaring parts of Willis’s game that makes me hesitant on his transition to the NFL. His offense lacks true NFL reads and doesn’t show him making progression consistently. Overall accuracy has been far too inconsistent for a first round pick paired with turnover trouble.

Running Backs

Breece Hall, Iowa State

A future bell-cow running back, Breece Hall looks the part of an NFL back. Standing at 6-foot-1 205 pounds, Hall has all the explosiveness you could want in the 2022 NFL Draft. Hall was a 1,500+ yard runner in 2020 and looked dominant at points throughout the season.

Missed tackles and staying on his feet are big strengths in his game, both will translate to the NFL. Hopefully, more added work in the pass game and Hall could become an all-around great running back.

Isaiah Spiller, Texas A&M

Part of a talented running back room, Isaiah Spiller was the focal point of this Aggie offense in 2020. At 225 pound, Spiller’s game is predicated around his power running style. He’s not the fastest athlete on the field, but is tough to bring down with just one tackler.

Spiller is able to pick apart running lanes at the line of scrimmage and attack with a low center of gravity. NFL teams with a power run style will love the way Spiller runs the rock.

Zonovan Knight, NC State

Zonovan Knight is just one half of a special running back tandem for the Wolfpack offense. Knight may not have the raw numbers other backs in this class have put up, but he’s shown to be extremely efficient with his workload. A quick runner, makes people miss consistently, and is a plus receiver out of the backfield and in the slot.

The question for Knight will be, can he take on a bigger workload in the NFL? It’s a question right now, but by the end of the season it may not matter when he’s shredding ACC defenses.

Ainias Smith, Texas A&M

Widely considered as a slot receiver, Smith brings a dynamic profile to this 2022 NFL Draft class. Smith was used all over the field for the Aggies in 2020 catching 43 passes and running 49 times. Averaging 9.3 yards per touch, Smith brings an unique ability to an NFL offense that allows offensive coordinators to get creative with his usage. The ability to make defenders miss and create separation in the slot will create havoc for NFL defenses. 

Kyren Williams, Notre Dame

Behind a top notch offensive line, Kyren Williams was dominant in 2020. Williams accelerates through the hole well and runs super compact due to his size. At only 5-foot-9 195 pounds, he may be too small for NFL schemes, but he brings to the table some of the pass blocking ability of a running back. His willingness to step in the hole against blitzing linebackers is remarkable and will keep on the field for third downs in the NFL.

Wide Receivers

Garrett Wilson, Ohio State

Only around 70 catches to his name entering 2021, Garrett Wilson has emerged as a top end receiver prospect in the 2022 NFL Draft. Top end speed and separation skills are prevalent in Wilson’s game. He’s lethal at the top of routes and projects are a number one option in NFL offenses.

He had some drops in 2020 that are concerning, but the route running ability is undeniable. A true three level threat, Wilson will be a first round pick come April.

Treylon Burks, Arkansas

Freakish size and athleticism, Treylon Burks is a unique prospect. At 6-foot-3 230 pounds, Burks moves like a sub-200 pounder. His ability to move smoothly in and out of breaks paired with his length is hard to defend, especially out of the slot against smaller defensive backs.

He didn’t run an extensive route tree, but showed he can gain separation and win at the catch point. Burks is a monster after the catch, but hasn’t shown the ability to be a true X receiver in the NFL.

George Pickens, Georgia

Since the moment George Pickens has stepped on the field for the Bulldogs in 2019 he has dominated SEC defenses. His combination of size and explosiveness at the catch point is unmatched.

A brutal ACL tear this past spring may have jeopardized his junior season, but he’s put out plenty of tape to keep him at the top of this receiver class. Pickens is a true vertical threat that will be able to win downfield with his size consistently. A couple concerning personality flags, but who doesn’t love the guy that talks trash and backs it up.

Justyn Ross, Clemson

After a scary neck injury that sidelined him for all of the 2020 season, Justyn Ross is back and ready to make that jump to the NFL. When Ross and Lawrence exploded onto the scene in 2018, it seemed like this duo would be unbeatable.

Ross didn’t get back to the same production in 2019, but the big time play ability is still there. It may be risky ranking Ross this high, but if he can get back to his 2018 play the hype will be back for his NFL projection.

Zay Flowers, Boston College

A true speedster, Zay Flowers has been a consistent third level threat for the Eagles offense. Flowers has great top end speed and short area quickness to be a threat with the ball in his hands. At only 5-foot-11 179 pounds, he may just be a slot receiver at the next level.

His hands haven’t been consistent with seven drops in 2020. Every NFL offense is looking for elite speed at receiver and Flowers has that in the 2022 NFL Draft. Get this man to Buffalo and let him run under Josh Allen moon balls

Tight Ends

Jalen Wydermyer, Texas A&M

Prototypical NFL tight end size at 6-foot-5 265 pounds with great length. Wydermyer was the safety valve for Kellen Mond consistently and torched the middle of the field. Good feel for separating against linebackers and making catches in traffic. For his size, you expect a bit more as a blocker, but can improve mightily with his raw strength. Not a dynamic athlete like Pitts, but should be a productive NFL tight end.

Austin Stogner, Oklahoma

Stogner is another 2022 NFL Draft prospect with a great size profile that projects well into the NFL. Good blend of speed and route running allows him to get open across the middle of the field. Caught less than 40 passes through two seasons at Oklahoma, need to see a bit more of an increase in volume this season. Stogner is a solid possession tight end that could be a solid compliment in an NFL offense.

Jahleel Billingsley, Alabama

Billingsley is a ‘move’ tight end that gained a ton of attention this summer in his small flashes last season for Alabama. At only 6-foot-4 230 pounds, most NFL teams may not see him as a tight end and lacks a true position. He went through disciplinary action after getting suspended from the team this summer. The athleticism and ability to create mismatches across the field is all there. The big question is if Billingsley can put it all together and get back in Saban’s good graces.

Josh Whyle, Cincinnati

One of the most intriguing prospects in the class, Whyle has NFL traits that can get you excited. Slimmer build at 6-foot-6 235 pounds, he has the frame to add more weight as he’ll need it to grow as a blocker. Good long speed paired with the ability to miss and break tackles after the catch.

He’s been underutilized in the Bearcat offense, but could be even better in the NFL. Every NFL team is looking for the next George Kittle, and I’m not comparing the two. However, if there’s someone with that type of ceiling it may just be Josh Whyle. 

Isaiah Likely, Coastal Carolina

The top target in the Coastal offense, Likely has been a dynamic threat with his athleticism. Easily one of the best route runners in the class, his ability to drop his hips and change direction is elite. He won’t be a run blocker at the next level, but will create mismatches in the slot and out wide. Should be a threat after the catch and getting the ball in his hands will be key for NFL offenses.

Offensive Line

Sean Rhyan, UCLA

An explosive athlete, Rhyan was a stud on the left side for the Bruins this past season. Exceptional strength in his hands and lower half, Rhyan displays a great job of taking on power and anchoring against rushers.

Rhyan shoots his hands and lands them consistently onto the pass rushers’ chest. A powerful tackler, Rhyan will have another strong season in 2021 and could solidify himself as a top tackle in the 2022 NFL Draft class.

Evan Neal, Alabama

Massive size and explosive profile, Neal moves extremely well for 6-foot-6 370 pounds. Quick out of his stance, Neal gets depth quickly, but needs to keep his feet moving. Neal brings a ton of versatility to the table, logging snaps at positions all across the offensive line. His length is exceptional on the outside, but will give NFL lines versatility given injuries. Neal has all the physical traits to be a top NFL talent.

Tyler Linderbaum, Iowa

Next in line for great Hawkeye lineman, Linderbaum has been outstanding at center for the past two seasons. Technically sounds, plays extremely low and wins with leverage consistently.

Stout build lacks strength at times against bigger defensive tackles. His athleticism projects well in wide zone schemes, he’s able to get leverage against three techniques or get the second level. Put Linderbaum in the middle of your line and running backs will have a field day.

Kenyon Green, Texas A&M

Green has lined up at guard for the past two seasons and has moved to tackle for the 2021 season. Strong at the point of attack, Green is able to get great push consistently in the run game. Green fires off the line of scrimmage and is exceptional at the second level. He’s shown inconsistencies landing his hands and keeping them inside the shoulder pads. Playing tackle this season will only help Green’s 2022 NFL Draft stock giving an NFL team’s versatility.

Trevor Penning, Northern Iowa

A bully on the outside, Penning put together an impressive spring season after losing Spencer Brown to the NFL. At 6-foot-7 321 pounds, Penning has elite size for an NFL tackle with length to control rushers easily. Patient hands, Penning knows when to shoot them and get them inside the pads. Comes off the ball with power and creates gaps in the run game. Stiffer athlete isn’t able to bend with power from rushers at times. Pennings has the ceiling to be above average as an NFL tackle.

Sours: https://www.downtownrams.com/single-post/2021/09/15/2022-nfl-draft-to-5-positional-rankings-on-offense/

Both Darian Kinnard and Chris Rodriguez appear to have at the very least maintained their 2022 NFL Draft stock four weeks into the 2021 season.

In Mel Kiper’s latest position rankings at ESPN, both Kinnard and Rodriguez rank among the top 10 at their respective positions.

Kinnard is ranked as the seventh-best offensive tackle on Kiper’s big board. The senior is the only offensive tackle in the country with a grade of 85 or higher in run and pass-blocking so far this season.

The Knoxville (TN) native was named First-Team All-SEC in 2020 and was expected by many to leave the Wildcats for the NFL after last season. Most outlets project him as a second or third-round draft choice, but if he continues to dominate and puts together a strong NFL combine next February, he could work himself into first-round consideration.

Rodriguez ranks tied for Kiper’s No. 10 running back. Through just four games, the junior has run for 513 yards on 83 attempts with three touchdowns placing him first in the conference by nearly 100 yards over second-place Tyler Badie of Missouri.

Last season in just nine games (missed two due to COVID-19), Rodriguez ran for 785 yards and 11 touchdowns on 119 attempts. The only problem for Rodriguez has been holding onto the ball, as he has fumbled four times this season. If he can improve his ability to protect the ball, he also could see his ranking surge.

Mel Kiper’s 2022 NFL Draft Offensive Tackle Rankings

  1. Evan Neal, Alabama Crimson Tide
  2. Charles Cross, Mississippi State Bulldogs
  3. Trevor Penning, North Iowa Panthers
  4. Nicholas Petit-Frere, Ohio State Buckeyes
  5. Daniel Faalele, Minnesota Golden Gophers
  6. Jaxson Kirkland, Washington Huskies
  7. Darian Kinnard, Kentucky Wildcats
  8. Kellen Diesch, Arizona State Wildcats
  9. Abraham Lucas, Washington State Cougars
  10. Andrew Stueber, Michigan Wolverines

Mel Kiper’s 2022 NFL Draft Running Back Rankings

  1. Breece Hall, Iowa State Cyclones
  2. Isaiah Spiller, Texas A&M Aggies
  3. Kyren Williams, Notre Dame Fighting Irish
  4. Tyler Goodson, Iowa Hawkeyes
  5. Zach Charbonnet, UCLA Bruins
  6. Mohamed Ibrahim, Minnesota Golden Gophers
  7. Pierre Strong Jr., South Dakota State Jackrabbits
  8. Zamir White, Georgia Bulldogs
  9. Rachaad White, Arizona State Sun Devils
  10. Chris Rodriguez, Kentucky Wildcats and Kenneth Walker III, Michigan State Spartans
Sours: https://www.aseaofblue.com/2021/10/1/22703635/2022-nfl-draft-rankings-darian-kinnard-chris-rodriguez-mel-kiper
  1. Footed metal bowl
  2. Split foyer design ideas
  3. All emblems destiny 2
  4. Car ceramic heater

Draft Power Rankings

1

Philadelphia Eagles

PHI

5, 6, 10, 41, 72, 118, 151, 157, 1855,455.02

Detroit Lions

DET

2, 24, 33, 66, 98, 144, 176, 180, 219, 233, 2434,370.23

New York Jets

NYJ

4, 12, 35, 52, 71, 113, 125, 147, 153, 2074,351.44

Jacksonville Jaguars

JAX

1, 34, 65, 83, 104, 152, 181, 189, 193, 222, 2524,170.25

New York Giants

NYG

7, 22, 38, 67, 69, 121, 145, 154, 186, 2273,434.36

Houston Texans

HOU

3, 39, 70, 82, 126, 146, 182, 194, 2513,243.47

Atlanta Falcons

ATL

8, 48, 55, 79, 116, 155, 1912,471.48

Miami Dolphins

MIA

11, 36, 99, 109, 114, 148, 179, 184, 1922,120.49

New England Patriots

NE

9, 40, 80, 117, 203, 2462,112.210

Washington Football Team

WSH

13, 44, 75, 112, 187, 2371,913.611

Minnesota Vikings

MIN

14, 45, 76, 173, 183, 188, 1901,832.012

Pittsburgh Steelers

PIT

15, 46, 77, 97, 177, 224, 2301,831.613

Kansas City Chiefs

KC

16, 47, 78, 115, 210, 229, 2311,705.414

Cincinnati Bengals

CIN

17, 50, 81, 120, 136, 159, 197, 2381,669.415

New Orleans Saints

NO

18, 49, 102, 119, 139, 160, 215, 2391,529.316

Denver Broncos

DEN

20, 51, 87, 124, 163, 199, 2401,483.017

Cleveland Browns

CLE

23, 54, 85, 103, 122, 161, 202, 2231,462.918

Baltimore Ravens

BAL

31, 63, 95, 101, 106, 133, 134, 137, 138, 2281,329.019

Las Vegas Raiders

LV

25, 57, 89, 127, 156, 167, 218, 2411,299.820

Green Bay Packers

GB

28, 59, 90, 130, 135, 169, 205, 220, 242, 2491,231.121

Buffalo Bills

BUF

26, 60, 91, 128, 170, 206, 232, 2471,216.422

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

TB

27, 58, 92, 129, 168, 248, 2601,203.223

Tennessee Titans

TEN

19, 86, 123, 140, 162, 1981,158.824

Dallas Cowboys

DAL

30, 61, 94, 131, 142, 172, 2081,142.825

Los Angeles Chargers

LAC

29, 62, 93, 132, 171, 209, 216, 217, 221, 250, 2571,139.426

Arizona Cardinals

ARI

32, 64, 96, 174, 175, 211, 253, 258, 2591,032.227

Carolina Panthers

CAR

21, 107, 143, 164, 200, 204, 244963.528

Indianapolis Colts

IND

37, 68, 105, 149, 178, 226, 234, 256922.029

Seattle Seahawks

SEA

43, 74, 108, 111, 150, 195, 236886.830

San Francisco 49ers

SF

42, 73, 110, 158, 235, 254, 255813.231

Los Angeles Rams

LAR

56, 88, 100, 141, 166, 212, 213, 214, 225, 245673.132

Chicago Bears

CHI

53, 84, 165, 201576.4
Sours: http://www.tankathon.com/nfl/power_rankings
Top 24 Running Back Rankings \u0026 Tiers - Week 6 Fantasy Football

Summer NFL Draft Rankings: Putting a grade on 153 FBS prospects in the 2022 NFL Draft

Summer Draft Rankings Top 153 players

By: AntoineTshiyombo @draftday101

All summer long I spent tireless hours studying prospects looking to give guys a starting point. It’s not where I will have them at the end of the year but more of what I for see them as for right now some guys got more projections because 2020 was a outlier years and so many mix situations from shortened season to opt out and guys being granted extra year of eligibility. But if your not familiar with my grading scale it goes like this.

Elite Grade/Hall of fame talent 200-190

1st  Round Grade/Pro Bowl Talent 189-175

2nd Round Grade/ Above Average Starter 174-150

3rd Round Grade/ Solid Starter 149-125

4th Round Grade/ future Starter Front line back up 124-100( I decided that the threshold I am will to stop by)

1. Derek Stingley Jr Cornerback Louisiana State 191: (JR) Three Generation of Defensive back Mutated in to this one phenomenal young Cornerback who step in day one . Stingley is refined in press man coverage has a great understanding of leverage route combination and spacing. Stingley has great ball skills with his 6 career interceptions and 20 pass break ups in 22 starts. Has allowed 58.1 NFL Passer rating when targeted on 40%. He did however struggle staying healthy last year both getting sick and a leg injury in 2020.

2. DeMarvin Leal Interior Defensive Lineman Texas A&M 188: Played Edge Most of the year. But was just as disruptive as Line up at edge 375 times at 6”4 290 and carried it well. Showed Speed bend and ability to shed. Had the twerk every time I watched him I started liking him more and more. 32 pressures last year a interception and 3 sacks.

3. Kayvon Thibodeaux Edge Oregon188: Guys Don’t come as long wiry and explosiveness. His first step leaves Tackles chasing. He hasn’t even put it all together but has the numbers of a first rounder 13 career sacks 46 hurries in his first 23 games. Developing a great timing and knocking down passes. Does how ever blindly throws himself into blockers.

4. Tyler Linderbaum Center Iowa 188: This guys is as elite as it gets in run blocking especially in zone stretches. He is under 300 pounds yet he can control guys who out weight him by 40 pounds with leverage and power. I have seen him put guys on their butts and he isn’t satisfied until. His Pass Protection is harder to read coming out of Iowa because there’s not as much traditional vertical sets. But didn’t give up pressure. Has only surrendered 1 sack so far in his college Career. Superb athletic ability from an interior lineman.

5. Thayer Munford Offensive Tackle  Ohio State187: Had his breakout season last year and could of came out for the 2021 NFL Draft. He had not Allowed a Single sack in 2020 and with no Penalties either. Munford was a road grade in the run game. I would love him for any team that uses a lot of Outside zone Runs. He went to good solid to elite blocker he does have already 2,400 snaps.

6. Spencer Rattler Quarterback Oklahoma 187 : Big time Arm. One of the most polarizing players on college football. Some people love him some people think he is a arrogant prick. But you can count on one thing Spencer Rattler Won’t Fold because of the pressure. Rattler displayed high level arm talent that can rival anyone in the country. He improved all through out the season and by the end of the season was playing like one of the best if not they best QB in the country. Spencer can fit ball in the tightest windows. Uses his eyes to Manipulate defenses at a high level. How ever Spencer gifts is his curse because he gets over confident that will end in

7. Kaiir Elam Cornerback Florida186: Turn zero to a hundred on a break he is one of the best I have seen probably since the great  Asante Samuel. He was outstanding in 2020 9 pass break ups and 65.8 passer rating when thrown at. His 5 career interceptions shows his ball skills. He has such fluid hips and can play off ball coverage with most young CB Seem to struggle with. His isn’t bad in Bump and run but could need some work with some of the techniques as far as footwork and hands. Better in Zone than his predecessor in the defense.

8. Kyle Hamilton Safety Notre Dame 185:A true high Safety with size and range. Ball skills are through the roof. Brings the wood in the run game coming down hill. 5 ints in his two year career so far 1 in 2020 wouldn’t feel comfortable playing him at the slot. Has been super consistent from the moment he stepped on the field.

9. Chris Olave Wide Receiver Ohio State 180: A big play artist 8 catches of 20 plus yards in just 7 games. Olave was a player many expected to be available for the 2021 NFL draft but opted to comeback to school. Olave has outstanding hands, good stop and start ability and fits the mold of an NFL Number one Wide Receiver

10. Owen Pappoe Linebacker Auburn 180: This is a guy I found out about late into my summer evaluations. Owen is a 2 year starter in the SEC who excelled in pass coverage at 6”1 222 pounds Owen has Saftey like movement at will linebacker where he projects at the next level. He needs to clean up his tackling if he is going to be a top half of the first round pick.

11. Andrew Booth Jr Cornerback Clemson 179: A part time starter that showed raw physical tools to keep up with his predecessors at the cornerback position at Clemson. Has the ideal size for an outside CB but his poor technique has to improve. But with only 219 career coverage snaps it’s not a far stretch to say that he could and would. He allowed a outstanding 59.6 passer Rating(NFL)  when target. He is more projection on this list then Proven product.

12. Daxton Hill Safety Michigan 178: Draxton Hill reportedly ran a 4.30 in high school and it shows up on tape. Has the closing speed and range to man the free Saftey but has just as much experience playing as the 8th man in the box.

13. Evan Neal Offensive Tackle Alabama 178. Started at Left guard on a loaded Alabama offensive line as a true freshman and got better than made the move to right tackle in 2020 and had a bit more of an up and down year than most would of thought considering he is an absolute animal physically. Listed at 6”7 350 pounds and can jump out of the gym clocking in at 18 miles an hour in movement he topped Bruce Feldmans freaks list this year. Hasn’t learned to transfer weight on his anchor and his hand placement still needs work but has all the skills in Pedigree to be a corner stone starter in the NFL. Will be moving to Left tackle where his last two predecessors Where selected in the first round of the NFL draft

14. Nicholas Petit-Frere Offensive Tackle Ohio State 178: The other tackle at The Ohio state. Played right tackle last year displayed good ability to keep his QB Clean not allowing any sacks and only 3 hits as a first time starter in a 7 game season. Really provided a bump in the running game and good low level of gravity. I could see Nicholas being not talked about during the season because he isn’t on preseason lists but will start getting all the praise at the end. Assuming he makes the Jump and keeps it up.

15. Myjai Sanders Edge Cincinnati:178: Absolutely blessed with a first step Quickness that far and few players at his size have. He showed out on some of the bigger games last year but would sometimes disappear in games that where not big on the schedule. His ability to bend the corner is something that can make him an elite pass rusher. Expect sub 4.6 Speed from this guy with plus 44 inch vertical. With arms like a Siamang this guys has a lethal  one hand stab. One of the most fun I had watching tape this summer.

16. Kingsley Enagbare Edge South Carolina 177: Enagbare has got better production every year of his career I watch small clips of him from freshman year to sophomore year to Junior year the film has made match. Has power hands and has a trump card and that is his bull rush. Once he gets his hands on your chest as a blocker he can do what he wants to you. Converts power to speed.

17. Boye Mafe Edge Minnesota 177: With a 40 inch vertical 4.3 short shuttle and sub 4.6 40 Mafe backs up his Freak numbers with production. His 6 sacks in 6 games 15 total pressure displayed what your looking for. All do Mafe is a freak he isn’t winning with bend and is a bit stiff. But still transfers his speed to power and has a good shoulder dip.

18. Cain Madden Offensive Guard Notre Dame 175: Was a monster at guard for Marshall was the best run blocker I watched for this draft cycle so far. He was a walk on that worked his way to one of the best collegian football players. He is now taking his talents to south bend Indiana for his final season. Cain is a older prospect at 25 so there a chance he gets over looked so all do I have a high grade on him the NFL might not see things because they value age more than I do.

19. George Pickens Wide Receiver Georgia 175: Tore his ACL in spring and will miss most if not all of this season but I have no doubt if he was 100 he would be my summer #1 WR. Pickens breaks on a stop and start rival some of the most elite WRs in the NFL. Has ball tracking skills and was 64.3 on contested catches almost all his drop where just flat out drops so that is a concern. He has ideal X wide receiver size at 6”3  and I still believe his best football is ahead of him pending his recovery.

20. Sam Howell Quarterback North Carolina 174: One of the Most Efficient Deep ball Passers in the country last year. Howell has been the man in Chapel Hill From the day he walked on. Not the biggest are freakish Arm. Howell has displayed accuracy touch and mobility. He has most of the hard stuff down but the easy things like checking down the ball the right time throwing the ball way he has struggled with but should improve. Doesn’t have a trump card.

21. Brandon Joseph Safety Northwestern: Super productive Safety that lacks a elite physical tools but makes up with it with outstanding ball skills and is extremely instinctual. Is a 3rd year sophomore so he might not come out until 2024 end the season with 6 interceptions in 9 games Fits more as a two high Safety or single high not ideal box player.

22. Darian Kinnard Offensive Tackle  Kentucky 174: A two year starter at Right Tackle for the wildcats and is a muller. He can get at the second level with ease. Some have suggested playing him at guard but I would let him fail at Tackle before moving him to Guard. Kinnard isn’t sometimes over steps and needs a lot of work in pass Protection especially vs the speed rush. All do he does anchor pretty well vertical pass sets needs heavy work if he is to stay at tackle because right now the plan is to get to his right shoulder and go when facing him.

23. Drake London Wide Receiver Southern California 174: Was a big slot WR for Southern Cal the last two years and when plays had to be made in the clutch USC would run there offense through London. Despite facing Linebackers and Saftey often in contested catches London had 0 drops on 43 targets on 33 Catches. London moves to the outside this year and will show those Basketball skills where he was on the College team as well before retiring this season. He was a star in the hardwood average 26 points a game in high school and his 11 rebounds a game translates well on the football field as he is able to pull down balls. Doesn’t have great start sop ability and is stiff but has enough speed to be a true deep threat.

24. Breece Hall Running Back Iowa State 173

25. Emory Jones Quarterback Florida 173

26. John Matchie III Wide Receiver Alabama 173

27. Trent McDuffie Cornerback Washington 172

28. Malik Willis Quarterback Liberty 172

29. Josh Jobe Cornerback Alabama: 171

30. Ochaun Mathis Edge Texas Christian: 171

31. Isaiah Likely Tight End Costal Carolina 170

32. Jaxson Kirkland Offensive Tackle Washington 169

33. Jermayne Lole Defensive Lineman Arizona State 169

34. Jalen Wydermyer Tight End Texas A&M 169

35. Haskell Garrett Interior Defensive Lineman Ohio State 168

36. Jordan Battle Safety  Alabama 167

37. Aidan Hutchinson Edge Michigan 166

38. Johnathan Tyler(J.T) Daniels Quarterback Georgia 166

39. Carson Strong Quarterback Nevada 165

40. Jeffery Gunter Edge Costal Carolina 164

41. Ventrell Miller Linebacker Florida 164

42. Isaiah Tomas Edge Oklahoma 163

43. Christian Harris Linebacker Alabama 161

44. Martin Emerson Jr Cornerback Mississippi State 160

45. Drake Jackson Edge Southern California 158

46. Kyler Gordon Cornerback Washington 157

47. Garrett Wilson Wide Receiver Ohio State 157

48. Jahleel  Billingsley Tight End Alabama 156

49. Cade Otton  Tight End Washington 155

50. Verone  McKinley III Saftey Oregon 154

51. Sean Rhyan Offensive Tackle California Los Angeles 154

52. Reggie Robinson Jr Wide Receiver Southern Methodist:153

53. Zion Tupuola-Fetui  Edge Washington:153

54. Christopher Allen Edge Alabama 152

55. Isaiah Spiller Running Back Texas A&M 152

56. David Bell Wide Receiver Purdue 151

57. Nakobe  Dean Linebacker Georgia 151

58. Zach Harrison Edge Ohio State 151

59. Tre’Vuis Hodges-Tomlinson Cornerback Texas Christian:151

60. Roger McCray Cornerback Auburn 151

61. Treylon Burks Wide Receiver Arkansas 150

62. Brenton Cox Jr Edge Florida 150

63. Kenyon Green Offensive Guard Texas A&M: 150

64. Isaac Rex Tight End Brigham Young:150

65. Mike Rose Linebacker Iowa State 150

66. Kevin Harris Running Back South Carolina 149

67. Mike Jones Jr Linebacker Louisiana State 149

68. Cordell Volson Offensive Tackle North Dakota State:149

69. Sevyn Banks Cornerback Ohio State 148

70. Charlie Koler Tight end Iowa State: 148

71. Devin Lloyd Linebacker Utah: 148

72. Demani Richardson  Saftey Texas A&M 148

73. Jaquarii Roberson Wide Receiver Wake Forest 148

74. Justyn Ross Wide Receiver Clemson: 148

75. Tre Turner Wide Receiver Virginia Technical 148

76. Adam Anderson Edge Georgia 147

77. Tyler Allgeier Running Back Brigham Young:147

78. Tiawan Mullen Cornerback Indiana 147

79. Zion Nelson Offensive Tackle Miami FL 147

80. Dion Novil Interior Defensive lineman North Texas: 147

81. Josh Whyle Tight End Cincinnati 147

82. Jeremy Ruckert Tight End Ohio State 146

83. Tyreek Smith Safety Georgia 146

84. Micah McFadden Linebacker Indiana 145

85. Trevor Penning Offensive Tackle Northern Iowa:145

86. Ahmad Gardner Cornerback Cincinnati 142

87. Max Borghi Running Back Washington State 141

88. Jahan Dotson Wide Receiver Pennsylvania State:141

89. Ty Fryfogle Wide Receiver Indiana 141

90. Eric Gray Running Back Oklahoma 141

91. Austin Stogner Tight end Oklahoma 141

92. Jordan Davis Interior Defensive Lineman Georgia: 139

93. Nick Muse Tight End South Carolina 139

94. Desmond Ridder Quarterback Cincinnati:139

95. Jamaree Salyer Guard  Georgia 139

96. Mohammed Ibrahim Running Back Minnesota 138

97. Jalen Tolbert Wide Receiver South Alabama:138

98. Jake Furgerson Tight End Wisconsin 137

99. Alec Lindstrom Center Boston College 137

100. Romeo Doubs Wide Receiver Nevada: 135

101. Isaiah Chambers Edge McNeese 134

102. George Karlaftis Edge Purdue 134

103. Matthew Corral Quarterback Mississippi 133

104. Travis Jones Defense Lineman Connecticut 133

105. Khalil Sharkir Wide Receiver Boise State 133

106. Zachary Carter Interior Defensive Lineman Florida: 132

107. Theo Wease Wide Receiver Oklahoma 132

108. Akaylab Evans Cornerback Missouri 131

109. Dominic Blaylock Wide Receiver Georgia: 130

110. Daniel Faalele Offensive Tackle Minnesota:128

111. Quidaruis  Smoke Monday Safety Auburn 128

112. Olakunle Fatukasi Linebacker Rutgers  127

113. Phil Jurkovec Quarterback Boston College 127

114. Brook Kennedy Running Back Oklahoma 126

115. Jack Sanborn Linebacker Wisconsin 125

116. Lewis Cine Saftey Georgia 125

117. Myron Cunningham Offensive Tackle Arkansas: 125

118. Jarrett Kingston offensive Guard Washington State 125

119. Cam Taylor-Britt Cornerback Nebraska 125

120. Henry To’otoo’o Linebacker Alabama:124

121. Colin Newell Center Iowa State 122

122. Ikem Ekwonu Offensive Guard North Carolina State 121

123. Christopher Hinton Defensive Lineman Michigan 121

124. Josh Thompson Cornerback Texas 121

125. Rasheed Walker Offensive Tackle Pennsylvania State 121

126. Ronnie Bell wide Receiver Michigan 119

127. Coby Bryant Cornerback Cincinnati: 117

128. Cade Hall Edge San Jose State 115

129. Ali Gaye Edge  Louisiana State 114

130. D’Eriq King Quarterback Miami FL  114

131. Amare Barno Edge Virginia Technical 113

132. Nik Bonitto Linebacker Oklahoma 112

133. Xavier Thomas Edge Clemson 112

134. Chris Rodriguez Jr  Running Back Kentucky 111

135. Devonte Wyatt Defensive Lineman Georgia 111

136. DeAngelo Malone Linebacker Western Kentucky 110

137. Kalon Barnes Cornerback Baylor 109

138. Trajan Jeffcoat Edge Missouri 109

139. Avery Roberts Linebacker Oregon State 108

140. Drew White Linebacker Notre Dame 108

141. Trey Dean III Saftey Florida 106

142. Thomas Booker Defense Lineman Stanford 105

143. Dell Pettus Saftey Troy 105

144. Bubba Bolden Saftey Miami FL 104

145. Phidarian Mathis Interior Defensive Lineman Alabama 104

146. Tre Sterling Safety Oklahoma State 104

147. Connor Galvin Offensive Tackle Baylor 103

148. Steven Gilmore Cornerback Marshall 102

149. Bo Melton Wide Receiver Rutgers 102

150. Ellis Brooks Linebacker Pennsylvania State 101

151. Master Teague Running Back Ohio State 101

152. Tyreke Smith Edge Ohio State 100

153. Payton Wilson Linebacker North Carolina State 100

featurefeatured

NFL Draft Diamonds was created to assist the underdogs playing the sport. We call them diamonds in the rough. My name is Damond Talbot, I have worked extremely hard to help hundreds of small school players over the past several years, and will continue my mission. We have several contributors on this site, and if they contribute their name and contact will be in the piece above. You can email me at [email protected]

Sours: https://www.nfldraftdiamonds.com/2021/08/nfl-draft-rankings/

Draft rankings nfl

NFL Draft prospects 2022: Updated big board of top 50 players overall, position rankings

Share

2022-nfl-draft-big-board

With the kickoff of another exciting college football season, it's time to look at the updated list of best prospects for the 2022 NFL Draft class. There is plenty of strength at the top of Sporting News' latest big board, with quarterbacks (who else?) carrying the most buzz, whether from the Power 5 or smaller schools.

Wide receivers and offensive linemen also shine brightly in the spotlight, mixed in with some elite impact defenders. Here's scouting out the players to watch most for earning first- or second-round status next April:

NFL MOCK DRAFT 2022:
Alabama, Ohio State, Oklahoma, Cincinnati players dominate Round 1

NFL Draft prospects 2022: Big board of top 50 players  

1. Derek Stingley Jr., CB, LSU (6-1, 195 pounds)

Stingley is one of the most dynamic cornerback prospects ever with his pedigree and playmaking resume. He's got great size and speed and can often win his battles with his length and quickness. There are few holes in his coverage game and he's also the ultimate ballhawk.

2. Evan Neal, OT, Alabama (6-7, 350 pounds)

Neal will be a dominant blocking force in the NFL. He's ultra-athletic for such a large frame, agile enough to handle the best pass rushers and powerful enough to move defenders out of the way in the running game.

3. Spencer Rattler, QB, Oklahoma (6-1, 200 pounds)

Rattler is in a great offensive system with Lincoln Riley to emerge as an elite prospect this season. He has natural athleticism and accuracy. He just needs to get better with the mental aspects of the game and get a little stronger overall.

4. Malik Willis, QB, Liberty (6-1, 215 pounds)

Willis is a new mashup of Zach Wilson and Trey Lance, a fast riser who's gotten more attention for an amazing skill set. He has top-flight athleticism and the strong arm to make every throw. He's also physically and mentally tough.

5. Sam Howell, QB, North Carolina (6-1, 220 pounds)

Howell is a smart, seasoned and accurate pocket passer. He doesn't have the dynamic athleticism of Rattler and Willis but it wouldn't be surprising if he became a mashup of Trevor Lawrence and Mac Jones.

MORE: Each team's worst-ever NFL Draft regret

6. DeMarvin Leal, DT, Texas A&M (6-4, 290 pounds)

Leal has the ideal power and explosiveness to disrupt things up front lining up everywhere. He can thrive as either a 4-3 tackle or 3-4 end.

7. Kayvon Thibodeaux, EDGE, Oregon (6-5, 258 pounds)

Thibodeaux is off the charts athletically in every aspect, an explosive pass rusher and agile pursuit man who covers a ton of ground. He also brings underrated power with the speed.

8. Kyle Hamilton, S, Notre Dame (6-4, 220 pounds)

Hamilton is smart and physical. He has the instincts and athleticism to diagnose plays and react quickly to make plays all over the field vs. run and pass. He's one of the most complete, intimidating safety prospects ever.

9. Jaxson Kirkland, OT, Washington (6-7, 310 pounds)

Kirkland is a big athlete made for smooth pass protection. He uses his hands and feet well together to win most of his battles.

10. Kedon Slovis, QB, USC (6-3, 205 pounds)

Slovis can pick up any offense and read any defense with his natural high level of football intelligence. He also delivers accurate balls with good decision-making. He's got to get a little better with his physical skill set in terms of arm and athleticism, but he will help himself by continuing to develop his mechanics and footwork.

11. Kalir Elam, CB, Florida (6-2, 196 pounds)

Elam's physical strength and length stand out as a bigger corner. He is very efficient in coverage with his athleticism, which at times is explosive.

12. Drake Jackson, EDGE, USC (6-4, 250 pounds)

Jackson is another agile and versatile outside defender in this class. He could benefit from bulking up and polishing up his pass-rush repertoire.  

13. Chris Olave, WR, Ohio State (6-1, 189 pounds)

Olave has great speed, quickness and burst to stand out in a strong wide receiver class.

14. Myjai Sanders, EDGE, Cincinnati (6-5, 255 pounds)

Sanders is a physical beast with some classic freakish pass-rush qualities. He will be a terror getting to the QB before rounding out his game.

15. Zion Nelson, OT, Miami (6-5, 316 pounds)

Nelson is a very agile blocker who can win with his quickness at the line but also get downfield when needed. He is equally reliable in pass protection and the running game.

MORE: The biggest busts in NFL Draft history

16. John Metchie III, WR, Alabama (6-0, 195 pounds)

Metchie is the latest Crimson Tide speed merchant, combining some of the qualities of Henry Ruggs III and Jaylen Waddle. He also can be a smooth technician like Jerry Jeudy and DeVonta Smith.

17. Andrew Booth Jr., CB, Clemson (6-0, 200 pounds)

Booth has fine size, strength and aggressiveness to boost himself in coverage. He also has great ball skills with a nose for big plays.

18. Garrett Wilson, WR, Ohio State (6-0, 188 pounds)

Wilson is a great complement to Olave with his smarts, quickness, route-running and hands. He is dangerous in making plays after the catch.

19. George Karlafits, EDGE, Purdue (6-4, 275 pounds)

Here's another version of a Greek freak as Karlaftis possesses elite athleticism for his size and is still tapping into his immense pass-rush potential.

20. Carson Strong, QB, Nevada (6-4, 215 pounds)

Strong has some Josh Allen qualities to him with ideal size and a massive arm, only with more underrated athleticism.

21. Ahmad Gardner, CB, Cincinnati (6-3, 200 pounds)

Gardner has great agility given his length and can move around wherever need to handle vertical or horizontal coverage.

22. Sevyn Banks, CB, Ohio State (6-1, 200 pounds)

Banks is an exceptional athlete, the classic size-speed prospect for his position. He just needs to refine his coverage technique.

23. Desmond Ridder, QB, Cincinnati (6-4, 215 pounds)

Ridder is an aspiring dynamic NFL dual threat with his combination of strong arm and natural running ability. He also has the welcome intangibles, including leadership skills and toughness.

24. Aidan Hutchinson, EDGE, Michigan (6-6, 265 pounds)

He's a technically sound and exceptionally strong prospect built to play 4-3 end and would benefit from improving his agility and expanding his pass-rush moves.

25. Tyler Linderbaum, C, Iowa (6-3, 290 pounds)

Linderbaum is a strong, athletic and relentless interior blocker. He has the intelligence and natural run blocking skills to be a decade-long fixture in the NFL.

MORE: The biggest steals in NFL Draft history

26. Christian Harris, LB, Alabama (6-2, 232 pounds)

Harris is the typical Crimson Tide top second-level defender with his speed and quickness that translate to sideline-to-sideline playmaking range.

27. Kenyon Green, G, Texas A&M (6-4, 325 pounds)

Green is a well-rounded interior blocker with solid size, strength and technique to thrive in the running game for a long time.

28. Brandon Joseph, S, Northwestern (6-1, 192 pounds)

Joseph is a natural big playmaker against the pass who also shows off his strength and physicality in cleaning up against the run.

29. Jordan Davis, DT, Georgia (6-6, 340 pounds)

Davis is getting more attention for the athleticism he possesses to disrupt plays on top of his massive frame.

30. Brandon Smith, LB, Penn State (6-3, 241 pounds)

Smith is very athletic and covers a lot of ground in coverage and run support. He can be the ideal strongside star in the NFL.

31. Trent McDuffie, CB, Washington (5-11, 195 pounds)

McDuffie offers great explosiveness and quickness to stay with his coverage assignments. He also plays bigger than his size.

32. Zach Harrison, EDGE, Ohio State (6-6, 268 pounds)

Harrison is long and strong and has the versatility to get after quarterbacks in many ways. He also has good speed to balance out his powerful game.

33. Charles Cross, OT, Mississippi State (6-5, 310 pounds)

Cross has a powerful upper body, strong hands and a mean and nasty aspect to his blocking. He could still develop his agility and footwork to raise his game.

34. Jalen Wydermyer, TE, Texas A&M (6-5, 255 pounds)

Wydermyer has the ideal physical frame for the position and backs that up with a good mix of physical receiving and smart run blocking.

35. Isaiah Spiller, RB, Texas A&M (6-1, 215 pounds)

Spiller is built to be a physical back in the NFL with his ability to grind and pound out all the tough yardage between the tackles.

BIGGEST NFL DRAFT STEALS:
Round 4 | Round 5 | Round 6 | Round 7

36. Zion Johnson, OT/G, Boston College (6-3, 316 pounds)

Johnson's calling card for the Eagles has been strong and powerful run blocking. He is a road grader with the hands and enough agility to play either inside or at right tackle.

37. Treylon Burks, WR, Arkansas (6-3, 225 pounds)

Burks is a huge target with reliable big hands to match. He can dominate smaller, less physical corners and has deceptive speed.

38. Darian Kinnard, OT/G, Kentucky (6-5, 345 pounds)

Kinnard is a powerful run blocker who could use some refinement with his technique and how to best use his athleticism in pass protection. That points to him playing inside well in the NFL.

39. George Pickens, WR, Georgia (6-3, 200 pounds)

The biggest concerns with Pickens are tied to putting it all together with his health and intangibles. Otherwise, he's an impressive size-speed prospect who isn't afraid to get physical.

40. Perrion Winfrey, DT, Oklahoma (6-4, 292 pounds)

Winfrey offers good length and powerful moves. He needs to refine his technique and improve his effective speed to keep up the playmaking in the NFL.

41. Jordan Battle, S, Alabama (6-1, 210 pounds)

Battle is a cerebral playmaker who looks the part and has fine pedigree from his high-level cleaning up in Nick Saban's defense.

42. Brenton Cox Jr., EDGE, Florida (6-4, 253 pounds)

Cox is a bit of a scheme 'tweener with power and strength as his most favorable assets. He can develop the agility to be trusted in coverage in the NFL.

43. Tykee Smith, S, Georgia (5-10, 198 pounds)

Smith is a solid all-around safety prospect who stands out most because of his intelligence in reading the field and versatility to make plays everywhere.

44. Josh Jobe, CB, Alabama (6-1, 194 pounds)

Jobe isn't the biggest blazer, but he provides nice length and strength to help with his coverage. He is confident in his game, seen in how physical and aggressive he is.

45. Justyn Ross, WR, Clemson (6-4, 205 pounds)

Ross has a strong frame, which helps him excel as a physical and technical route-runner. He needs to come back strong from injury to raise his speed and quickness as a big possession target.

46. Cade Otton, TE, Washington (6-5, 250 pounds)

Otton is a superb athlete for the position and backs that up with reliable route-running and hands. He has room to grow as a blocker to match his frame.

47. Nik Bonitto, EDGE, Oklahoma (6-3, 240 pounds)

Bonitto has good versatility and quickness for his size with balanced passing game skills as a rusher and cover man.

48. Matt Corral, QB, Ole Miss (6-0, 200 pounds)

Corral is a dynamic athlete and confident runner who also shows aggressiveness with a big arm. His raw skills give him a lot of intrigue and upside.

49. Breece Hall, RB, Iowa State (6-1, 220 pounds)

Hall stands out with his ability to elude tacklers and explode for big plays in the open field. He can go from home-run hitter to more complete back.

50. David Bell, WR, Purdue (6-2, 205 pounds)

Bell has a rare blend of physicality and speed for the position. He excels at both bursting after the catch and stretching the field, using his body well to get open.

NFL Draft prospect rankings: Best players by position  

Quarterbacks  

  1. Spencer Rattler, Oklahoma
  2. Malik Willis, Liberty
  3. Sam Howell, North Carolina
  4. Kedon Slovis, USC
  5. Carson Strong, Nevada
  6. Desmond Ridder, Cincinnati
  7. Matt Corral, Ole Miss
  8. Kenny Pickett, Pittsburgh

Running backs

  1. Isaiah Spiller, Texas A&M
  2. Breece Hall, Iowa State
  3. Zamir White, Georgia
  4. Kyren Williams, Notre Dame
  5. Eric Gray, Oklahoma
  6. Zonovan Knight, NC State
  7. Jerrion Ealy, Ole Miss

Wide receivers 

  1. Chris Olave, Ohio State
  2. John Metchie III, Alabama
  3. Garrett Wilson, Ohio State
  4. Treylon Burks, Arkansas
  5. George Pickens, Georgia
  6. Justyn Ross, Clemson
  7. David Bell, Purdue
  8. Jahan Dotson, Penn State
  9. Romeo Doubs, Nevada
  10. Tre Turner, Virginia Tech
  11. Drake London, USC
  12. Jalen Tolbert, South Alabama

Tight ends

  1. Jalen Wydermyer, Texas A&M
  2. Cade Otton, Washington
  3. Charlie Kolar, Iowa State
  4. Jahleel Billingsley, Alabama
  5. Austin Stogner, Oklahoma
  6. Jeremy Ruckert, Ohio State
  7. Will Malory, Miami
  8. Jake Ferguson, Wisconsin

Offensive linemen  

  1. Evan Neal, OT, Alabama
  2. Jaxson Kirkland, OT, Washington
  3. Zion Nelson, OT, Miami
  4. Tyler Linderbaum, C, Iowa
  5. Kenyon Green, G, Texas A&M
  6. Charles Cross, OT, Mississippi State
  7. Zion Johnson, OT/G, Boston College
  8. Darian Kinnard, OT/G, Kentucky
  9. Rasheed Walker, OT Penn State
  10. Ikem Ekwonu, NC State
  11. Thayer Munford, OT, Ohio State
  12. Alec Lindstrom, C, Boston College
  13. Tyrese Robinson, G, Oklahoma
  14. Logan Brown, OT, Wisconsin
  15. Ed Ingram, G, LSU

Edge rushers

  1. Kayvon Thibodeaux, Oregon
  2. Drake Jackson, USC
  3. Myjai Sanders, Cincinnati
  4. George Karlaftis, Purdue
  5. Aidan Hutchinson, Michigan
  6. Zach Harrison, Ohio State
  7. Brenton Cox Jr., Florida
  8. Nik Bonitto, Oklahoma
  9. Kingsley Enagbare, South Carolina
  10. Adam Anderson, Georgia
  11. Tyreke Smith, Ohio State
  12. Ali Gaye, LSU
  13. Isaiah Thomas, Oklahoma

Defensive tackles   

  1. DeMarvin Leal, Texas A&M
  2. Jordan Davis, Georgia
  3. Perrion Winfrey, Oklahoma
  4. Tyler Davis, Clemson
  5. Chris Hinton, Michigan
  6. Deslin Alexandre, Pittsburgh
  7. Haskell Garrett, Ohio State
  8. D.J. Dale, Alabama
  9. Cory Durden, NC State

Linebackers   

  1. Christian Harris, Alabama
  2. Brandon Smith, Penn State
  3. Henry To'o-To'o, Alabama
  4. Ventrell Miller, Florida
  5. Nolan Smith, Georgia
  6. Mike Jones Jr., LSU
  7. Devin Lloyd, Utah
  8. Nakobe Dean, Georgia
  9. Merlin Robertson, Arizona State

Cornerbacks

  1. Derek Stingley Jr., LSU
  2. Kaiir Elam, Florida  
  3. Andrew Booth Jr., Clemson
  4. Ahmad Gardner, Cincinnati
  5. Sevyn Banks, Ohio State
  6. Trent McDuffie, Washington
  7. Josh Jobe, Alabama
  8. Mykael Wright, Oregon
  9. Derion Kendrick, Georgia
  10. Isaac Taylor-Stuart, USC
  11. Tiawan Mullen, Indiana
  12. Akayleb Evans, Missouri
  13. Joey Porter Jr., Penn State

Safeties

  1. Kyle Hamilton, Notre Dame
  2. Brandon Joseph, Northwestern
  3. Jordan Battle, Alabama
  4. Tykee Smith, Georgia
  5. Jaquan Brisker, Penn State
  6. Lewis Cine, Georgia
  7. Jalen Catalon, Arkansas
  8. Bubba Bolden, Miami
  9. Smoke Monday, Auburn
Tom-Brady-Jalen-Hurts-101121-GETTY-FTR

Eagles vs. Buccaneers odds, prediction, betting trends for NFL 'Thursday Night Football'

Eagles vs. Buccaneers odds, prediction, betting trends for NFL 'Thursday Night Football'

Chris-Godwin-DeVonta-Smith-101121-GETTY-FTR

What time is the NFL game tonight? TV schedule, channel for Buccaneers vs. Eagles in Week 6

What time is the NFL game tonight? TV schedule, channel for Buccaneers vs. Eagles in Week 6

Tom-Brady-Jalen-Hurts-101121-GETTY-FTR

What channel is Buccaneers vs. Eagles on today? Schedule, time for NFL 'Thursday Night Football' in Week 6

What channel is Buccaneers vs. Eagles on today? Schedule, time for NFL 'Thursday Night Football' in Week 6

Thursday-Night-Football-090920-FTR

Who plays on 'Thursday Night Football' tonight? Time, TV channel, schedule for NFL Week 6

Who plays on 'Thursday Night Football' tonight? Time, TV channel, schedule for NFL Week 6

Andy-Reid-09262021-Getty-FTR

Why can't the Eagles quit Andy Reid? Chiefs head coach's fingerprints are still all over Philadelphia

Why can't the Eagles quit Andy Reid?

More

Sours: https://www.sportingnews.com/us/nfl/news/nfl-draft-prospects-2022-player-rankings-big-board/1v8x3glmw5v3912v3d93agdk8x
2021 NFL Draft Grades

2021 NFL Draft class rankings: Bears, Chargers, Jets top the board

Why provide instant grades on the selections of prospects who have yet to take an NFL snap? Well, you're reading this, aren't you? Considering the makeup of every roster and the factors surrounding each pick, Gennaro Filice and Dan Parr rank the 2021 draft classes, 1-32.

Chicago Bears

Grade: A | Total picks: 7

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

FILICE: Oh, what a difference a draft pick makes! Amirite, Matt Nagy and Ryan Pace?? Back in January, after news broke that Chicago would be retaining the embattled coach-GM duo for 2021, Bears fans got mad online. Looking to explain the decision and address fan uproar, team chairman George McCaskey hopped on a video conference to field questions from reporters, stating the obvious: "We need better production from the quarterback position to be successful." When asked directly if Bears brass remained confident that Nagy and Pace could solve the QB riddle that's befuddled the franchise for most of its existence, McCaskey didn't waiver: "Yes, we are." Those words didn't age well when Chicago, after headline-grabbing Russell Wilson trade flirtations, came out of free agency with Andy Dalton as QB1. Heading into the draft, there was a dark energy around this team, an ominous feeling that the current regime would spend 2021 playing out the string before hitting the unemployment line. But then something magical happened: Justin Fields began to slide. And when the Ohio State quarterback surprisingly remained on the board through Carolina and Denver's picks, the Bears pounced, jumping up from No. 20 to 11 to secure the dynamic dual-threat's services. The vibe in Chicago instantly flipped: Hope sprung! Feeling his trade-up oats, Pace moved up again on Day 2 to grab Jenkins, a violent tackle who was routinely projected as a first-rounder in Mock SZN. Suddenly, the arrow's pointing up for the Bears -- and for the continued employment of Nagy and Pace.

Los Angeles Chargers

Grade: A- | Total picks: 9

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

PARR: GM Tom Telesco had an ideal start to the draft, setting the tone for an outstanding weekend of work. I ranked OT and CB as the team's top two needs and they expeditiously took care of business on both fronts, finding players who'll be starting at those spots for a long time. Slater is the left tackle the Bolts have been craving for quite a while, a technician who has already proven he can more than hold his own against elite talents. Like Slater, Samuel doesn’t have the ideal size for his position, but he'll more than make up for that with his instincts and ball skills. He should thrive in Brandon Staley’s defense. We wouldn’t have minded seeing the team add a safety earlier on, but that's one of the few nits you can pick here. Two of the Chargers' Day 3 picks -- Rumph and Niemann -- made NFL.com analyst Lance Zierlein’s list of his three favorite selections by round. Who am I to argue with a guy who studied and wrote profiles for 450-plus prospects this year? This is an attractive draft haul from top to bottom.

New York Jets

Grade: A- | Total picks: 10

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

PARR: The decision to trade Sam Darnold and draft Wilson will make or break Joe Douglas’ tenure as general manager. I have my doubts about whether the BYU QB can live up to the absurd level of hype he has inspired in the past few months, but there’s no denying he’s an exciting talent. Get ready for some juicy off-platform throws, Jets fans! No one will remember this if Wilson doesn’t become a star, but Douglas did some really nice work after making the No. 2 overall pick. In fact, he landed three of Daniel Jeremiah’s top 26 prospects with his first three selections. He parted with a third-round pick to move up nine spots in the first round, but did so to acquire one of the draft’s safest players in Vera-Tucker, a plug-and-play guard. The Jets’ focus on improving the talent around Wilson continued with the selections of Moore -- a dynamo in the slot -- and Carter, an excellent fit for Mike LaFleur’s offense as a complementary back. You could argue the team should have addressed the need at cornerback earlier, but I’m not mad about any of those first four picks. Douglas did his job by making a concerted effort to avoid repeating the Jets’ mistake of failing to give their young QB adequate help.

Cleveland Browns

Grade: A- | Total picks: 8

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

PARR: The Browns didn't draft an edge rusher to groom behind Myles Garrett and Jadeveon Clowney, which is about the only decision to quibble with here. It could be one that comes back to bite GM Andrew Berry, especially if Clowney isn't able to stay healthy, but we didn't dock them major points since we liked so many of his other choices. Cornerback and linebacker were the other most pressing needs for a team that had to improve on defense. Fortunately, Berry was able to find two first-round values at those spots. Newsome was a steady riser throughout the spring because of his size, athleticism and instincts. He could be the answer opposite Denzel Ward. Owusu-Koramoah was thought to be a shoo-in for the first round but fell all the way to the 20th pick of Round 2 amid reports of a heart issue. Berry says he's seen nothing to "suggest he can't have a nice, long career." Later on, Cleveland added world-class speed at receiver (Schwartz), some needed depth in the trenches (Hudson and Togiai) and an undersized safety worth pounding the table for (LeCounte). The Browns did well in front of the home crowd.

Detroit Lions

Grade: A- | Total picks: 7

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 7:

FILICE: After a free agency experience largely defined by one-year deals with mid-level players, Lions fans headed into the draft wondering how the new regime would look to shape this roster. The first three picks told the story, with Detroit adding 938 pounds of nasty to the trenches. It began with the no-brainer selection of Sewell, an absolute mauler who won't turn 21 until the second month of his rookie season. This kind of prospect falling into the Lions' lap at No. 7 was a gift, and the Lions' war room suitably reacted like kids on Christmas morning. Next up: Onwuzurike, a 3-tech disruptor who's clearly Dan Campbell's kinda guy. "I like f------ people up," Onwuzurike told a titillated audience of Motor City media via video conference. "I like to get off the line and just put my helmet or my hands on an offensive lineman and f--- up an offensive scheme, pretty much. I like pushing 'em back 2, 3 yards and just making 'em feel like s---." WATCH YO' KNEECAPS!! In Round 3, Detroit scooped up McNeill, a pocket-collapsing nose tackle whose quick-twitch athleticism belies his 320-pound frame. The man played running back and middle linebacker in high school, for God's sake. And yes, the film's delicious. Don't look now, but the Lions have legit lines on both sides of the ball; the offensive front could be a top-five unit in 2021.

Miami Dolphins

Grade: A- | Total picks: 7

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 7:

PARR: The dream of landing Ja’Marr Chase or Kyle Pitts at No. 6 was foiled (as was the plan to pick Javonte Williams at No. 36, apparently), but GM Chris Grier still managed to walk away with a highly enticing haul. Miami had to add more juice on offense after ranking near the bottom of the league in explosive play rate last season. There might not be a better way to accomplish said goal than by adding Waddle, a player who drew a comparison to Tyreek Hill last month from NFL.com senior analyst and Pro Football Hall of Famer Gil Brandt. The Dolphins continued to boost Tua Tagovailoa’s supporting cast on Day 2 with the selection of Long, who can team with Mike Gesicki to give the offense a pair of seam stretchers. Eichenberg could easily be the starting right tackle from Day 1, and don’t sleep on the chance for Coleman, the team’s penultimate pick, to develop into a starter down the road. As for Brian Flores’ stout defense, nabbing Phillips was a home run. I raised an eyebrow at the Holland selection with Trevon Moehrig still on the board (which says absolutely nothing about how Holland will fare as a pro). All in all, coming out of the draft with four potential immediate starters is excellent work.

San Francisco 49ers

Grade: B+ | Total picks: 8

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 5:

Round 6:

FILICE: It seems like in every draft these days, a toolsy quarterback comes off the board in Round 1 only to be tagged with a warning label from draftniks and league folks alike: This is going to take time -- DO NOT rush him onto the field in Year 1! Last year, Justin Herbert was that guy. Then Tyrod Taylor's pregame shot went awry just before kickoff in Week 2 and Herbert proceeded to throw a rookie-record 33 touchdown passes in one of the finest debut seasons by a quarterback in NFL history. So forgive me for rolling my eyes at the slow-play crowd preaching patience before the Niners take their brand new No. 3 overall pick out of the box. Thankfully, Jimmy Garoppolo is still alive. But while the veteran quarterback remains on the roster today, there's no guarantee that remains the case through the summer. And regardless, let's be honest: This is Trey's team now. He'll get the starting reins whenever he's ready to rock -- and there's good reason to believe that'll be sooner than later. Many view his FCS pedigree as a significant hindrance, but North Dakota State runs its program with the kind of efficiency numerous FBS teams would die for. Not to mention, the Bison offense -- which routinely had Lance taking snaps from under center, calling out protections and executing traditional play-action concepts -- is far more translatable to Kyle Shanahan's system than most high-level college football attacks. Count me among the #LetTreyPlay contingent. So, what's keeping this grade out of "A" territory? Well, I'm not entirely sure how well San Francisco addressed additional areas of need. Injecting some youth into the aging offensive line was wise, but the athletically challenged Banks seems like an odd fit for Shanahan's zone-blocking scheme. And the secondary remains the most unsettled position group on the roster. Points for the RB value pick of Sermon midway through the third round, though.

Philadelphia Eagles

Grade: B+ | Total picks: 9

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

FILICE: The Eagles ultimately landed one of the top three receivers in the class, but what a long, strange trip it was. The team initially held the No. 6 overall pick, prime position to atone for last year's lamentable Jalen Reagor-over-Justin Jefferson decision by scooping up Ja'Marr Chase, Jaylen Waddle or Smith. But then the Eagles moved down to No. 12 in the back end of Miami's late-March trade two-step, throwing many Philly fans into a tizzy by seemingly exiting the range to nab one of this draft's elite talents. Then the draft gods smiled upon the City of Brotherly love. When the top two cornerbacks exited stage right before Dallas' No. 10 pick, the Cowboys immediately looked to trade down with somebody, anybody -- even a hated divisional rival. The Eagles, clearly surmising that the Giants were planning to select Smith at No. 11, leaped at the opportunity leapfrog Big Blue and take the reigning Heisman Trophy winner for themselves. Strange bedfellows teaming up to stab a common NFC East foe in the front? Apparently the draft's a delicious, prime-time soap opera! That wasn't the only spicy selection by the Eagles, either. In Round 2, Philly grabbed some much-needed O-line help with Dickerson, who could've been the first interior offensive lineman off the board if he hadn't torn his ACL in last December's SEC title game. The injury history's lengthy and concerning, but Dickerson's mix of athleticism and joyful destruction is the kind of stuff that makes an O-line coach fan his collar. And four straight middle-round selections caught my eye as potential value picks: Williams, McPhearson, Gainwell and Tuipulotu.

New York Giants

Grade: B+ | Total picks: 6

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 6:

FILICE: Over his first eight drafts as an NFL GM with the Panthers and Giants, Dave Gettleman made a total of 54 draft picks while never -- not once! -- trading down. This led to NFL Network draft guru Daniel Jeremiah uttering a memorable line in a conference call with reporters last month: "I think we'll see a right turn in a NASCAR race before we see Dave Gettleman trade back." Hmmm, anyone know if drivers were flipping the turn signal up last month at Talladega? Because last weekend, "Trader Dave" arrived! Gettleman moved down in New York's first two draft slots. And in addition to accumulating some valuable draft capital, he landed a pair of premium talents in need areas. The first trade-down, of course, came after Philadelphia jumped in front of New York to seize DeVonta Smith. But Gettleman recovered nicely by eventually landing Toney, whose catch-and-run play-making ability fits very nicely in a receiving corps that already includes a big-bodied pass catcher (Kenny Golladay) and a speedy deep threat (Darius Slayton). The onus now falls on offensive coordinator Jason Garrett to scheme up open-field opportunities for his new toy. But with this receiving corps, RB Saquon Barkley and TE Evan Engram, Gettleman has given his hand-picked signal-caller (Daniel Jones) more than enough weaponry to pay off a prove-it season. After the second trade-down of Gettleman's life, he checked the box on Big Blue's biggest draft need by selecting Ojulari to provide a legit edge-rushing presence. If concerns about the 20-year-old's knee prove overcooked, his slide to No. 50 could be an absolute godsend to New York's defense. Speaking of that Patrick Graham's unit, the G-Men added a versatile corner in Round 3 in Robinson, who offers the size, speed and physicality to excel between James Bradberry and Adoree' Jackson in the slot.

Jacksonville Jaguars

Grade: B+ | Total picks: 9

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

PARR: The Lawrence pick carries a lot of weight in the Jaguars’ grade. They drafted the best player to enter the league in a long time. There are points for that, no matter how easy the decision might seem. He’s going to be walking into a situation vastly superior to the ones many of his No. 1 overall pick predecessors inherited. Instant success is there for the taking. We’re not as high on some of Urban Meyer’s other moves in his first draft at the helm of an NFL team, but he was certainly consistent, addressing the team’s primary areas of need and spending all but one pick on players from the Power Five conferences. Etienne could be an absolute dynamo in Meyer’s offense, but we would have opted to fill a more pressing need with that pick. There were some reaches here for guys who haven’t played in a while -- Little has suited up for one game since the start of the 2019 season -- and waiting until Round 5 to take a tight end (one with 34 career receptions) was questionable. That said, if Lawrence and Etienne do their thing and a couple of the Day 2 picks eventually become solid starters, this will be a celebrated class.

Denver Broncos

Grade: B+ | Total picks: 10

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

PARR: Few teams did a better job of identifying and adding value than the Broncos. However, I happen to disagree with the decision to pass on Justin Fields at No. 9 overall. GM George Paton had the opportunity to pull Denver out of the QB wilderness for the first time since Peyton Manning rode off into the sunset, and he just couldn't bring himself to do it. Perhaps visions of Aaron Rodgers in orange and navy were dancing in his head. It's going to be a tough pill to swallow for this franchise, though, if Fields goes on to succeed while the Broncos remain mired in mediocrity (or worse) while employing the unexciting duo of Drew Lock and Teddy Bridgewater. Surtain was the safer play, and he gives Denver a deep secondary that will be the envy of the league, which is why the grade doesn't fall too far. Credit to Paton for being aggressive in the second round and trading up for Williams before the Dolphins had a chance to take him. Meinerz's rise is already the stuff of legend, and Cooper might have been the best value of the entire draft (NFL.com analyst Daniel Jeremiah's ranking: 120; Cooper’s draft slot: 239). Yes, there's much to be thrilled about here, even with a first-round decision that seems suspect right now.

Minnesota Vikings

Grade: B+ | Total picks: 11

Round 1:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

FILICE: After Penei Sewell and Rashawn Slater, Darrisaw was pretty widely viewed as the third-best offensive tackle in this class. That's where NFL.com's Bucky Brooks had him. And with the position being a crying need in Minnesota, no one would have batted an eye if the Vikings had selected him in their original draft slot at No. 14. Instead, Rick Spielman moved down to No. 23 in a trade with the Jets, picked up a pair of third-round picks in the process ... and still ended up with Darrisaw. Now THAT is how you draft! With the first of those freshly acquired third-rounders, Spielman nabbed a developmental quarterback with some intriguing tools -- a little too intriguing if you ask Robert Griffin III, who apparently has an axe to grind with former teammate Kirk Cousins. With the second third-rounder acquired from New York, Minnesota landed a potential starter at guard in Davis. He would've come off the board far earlier if not for an injury-riddled final season at Ohio State. And the dude's dad is Alvin Mack -- are you going to question his potential? Two more interesting picks for Minnesota: Surratt, a quarterback-turned-linebacker who's still learning his new position but possesses three-down tools; and Nwangwu, an explosive athlete who should have plenty of tread on the tires after receiving a limited workload in a talented Iowa State backfield.

Carolina Panthers

Grade: B | Total picks: 11

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

FILICE: Gonna lay my cards on the table here. I'm extremely conflicted with this grade. Truth is, I'm still kinda floored that the Panthers had Justin Fields fall right into their lap ... and they triggered the ejector seat. "The hit rate on first-round quarterbacks isn't real, real high, and to have a chance to get Jaycee Horn and have Sam Darnold, we just kind of felt like, 'Hey this is two-for-one,' " Matt Rhule explained on The Rich Eisen Show. "Now, we just have to make sure Sam's a great player for us." Easier said than done. Darnold was undoubtedly dropped into a rough situation with the Jets, but he wasn't just bad in New York, he was awful -- finishing near the bottom of qualified passers in completion percentage and passer rating all three years, including dead last in the latter (72.7) this past season. Not to mention, 2021 is Darnold's final cheap rookie contract season; the fifth-year option Carolina exercised on the Friday after Round 1 will pay him $18.858 million in 2022. If the Panthers had taken Fields at No. 8, he'd be due to earn about $5.275 million per year through 2024, per Spotrac. So I'm struggling with the rationale on that decision. BUT, if I remove the Fields factor from the equation, and just view Carolina's draft in a vacuum, I really like the team's haul! Heading into the draft, I viewed the Panthers' three biggest non-quarterback needs as cornerback, wide receiver and offensive line, and they checked those boxes with their first three picks. A lot of the middle-round selections look sharp, too, including Tremble (who got lost in the shuffle of Notre Dame's NFL tight end factory), Nixon (who's way quicker than a 313-pounder should be) and Brown (a massive man who blows open massive holes). So ... I'm docking Carolina a full letter grade for passing on Fields, but giving the franchise as solid a "B" as mathematically possible. We're talkin' 86.4%.

Atlanta Falcons

Grade: B | Total picks: 9

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

FILICE: The gamebreaker hype on Pitts couldn't be any higher, as evidenced by the fact that he just became the highest-drafted tight end in the common draft era and no one really questioned the pick. It was treated as a fait accompli. Nary an eyebrow raised! In today's take economy, where contrarianism's cryptocurrency-hot, this is rare. But so is Pitts. As a 6-6, 245-pounder with vice-grip hands and 4.4 speed, the 20-year-old has talent evaluators competing to provide the splashiest assessment. One GM told NFL Network's Tom Pelissero, "I'm usually against drafting tight ends that high, but that motherf-----'s bada--." While Atlanta clearly approached Day 1 with a best player available mindset, the Falcons looked to address needs in Day 2. Grant's a do-it-all safety who should be a Day 1 starter for Atlanta, which finished last season with the worst pass defense in the NFL. Mayfield initially got some first-round-tackle buzz after declaring for the draft, but the pre-draft process didn't treat him well. He bombed the athletic testing at his pro day, and the sub-33-inch arm length didn't help, either. The 326-pounder's probably looking at a move to the interior in the NFL, especially considering POWER is his calling card as a blocker. Atlanta did some nice work in Day 3. Two picks that really stood out to this grader: Dalman, who should compete for the starting center job; and Williams, who had insane special teams production at Boise State as a dangerous returner and prolific kick blocker.

Pittsburgh Steelers

Grade: B | Total picks: 9

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

PARR: Sensing that the contending window is nearly shut with Ben Roethlisberger entering his age-39 season, the Steelers clearly were on a mission to upgrade the QB's supporting cast on draft weekend. We're not going to see a repeat of the worst rushing attack in the league now that they have Harris running through defenders. He's the do-it-all back this team so badly needed. Now, with the twilight creeping in on Big Ben, we would have been a little more aggressive in Round 2 to land an offensive tackle, but it's hard to argue with the value or fit for Freiermuth, who's been compared to Tyler Eifert. GM Kevin Colbert did find help for the offensive line in the middle rounds. Green has some developing to do when it comes to pass protection, but he could be up to the challenge of filling the void left by Maurkice Pouncey's retirement. The Steelers didn't address the need for an edge rusher until Round 6, but landing Roche at Pick 216 was one of the best values of the draft. The merits of drafting a punter will be debated. If you're going to pick one, make sure he's built like a tank and can throw a touchdown pass.

Washington Football Team

Grade: B | Total picks: 10

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

FILICE: Are you the type of draft connoisseur who prefers unique athletes? Well, you've come to the right place! The Football Team's first three picks are three of the rarest physical specimens at their respective positions in this draft class. Davis posted some eye-popping numbers at the Kentucky pro day, including a 4.47 40-yard dash, a 42-inch vertical(!) and an 11-foot broad jump. This is the kind of explosiveness that plays in today's game, in which linebackers are routinely met with nightmare assignments. There's room for growth in pass coverage, but Davis has the kind of freaky athleticism that can't be taught. The biggest question on Washington's first-round pick: With these physical gifts at his disposal, why did it take until his breakout redshirt junior season to become a starter at Kentucky? Cosmi, on the other hand, started 34 games in his three non-redshirt seasons at Texas, and his 9.99 score in RAS (Kent Lee Platte's "Relative Athletic Score") ranks No. 2 among the 1,119 offensive tackles in his database that goes back to 1987. Simply put, the guy's quite an athlete at nearly 6-6 and 314 pounds. But like Davis, his technique needs some refinement. In Round 3, Washington landed a cornerback with an exceptional mix of size (6-3 1/2) and agility (6.63 three-cone drill). That's a whole lot of uncommon athleticism packed into three different body types. And I'd be remiss if I didn't mention Brown, who averaged 20 yards per catch and scored 20 touchdowns over his final two seasons at North Carolina. He'll drop a ball here and there, but the big plays just keep coming.

Cincinnati Bengals

Grade: B | Total picks: 10

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

PARR: It won't matter who's catching passes from Joe Burrow if he doesn't get the protection he needs to stay upright, so the case to take Penei Sewell over Chase at No. 5 makes some sense. That said, Chase was arguably a top-three talent in the draft and should resume setting off weekly firework displays with Burrow, like their days together at LSU ... again, if that O-line holds up. The 6-foot, 201-pounder could be the next Anquan Boldin. The Bengals traded out of the 38th pick, when OTs Teven Jenkins and Liam Eichenberg were still on the board, picking up a couple fourth-rounders from the Patriots to move down eight spots. Pocketing a little extra draft capital is always nice, but choosing Carman -- NFL.com analyst Daniel Jeremiah's 96th-ranked prospect -- at No. 46 seems like quite a reach. Ossai was a much better value in Round 3, but he's still a raw talent that will require some seasoning. They found some nice pieces for the O- and D-lines in the middle rounds. We wouldn't have minded it if they had employed a different strategy at kicker instead of making McPherson the first (and only) one off the board early in Round 5. If Carman becomes a quality starter at guard, this haul will be better than it looks on paper right now.

Baltimore Ravens

Grade: B | Total picks: 8

Round 1:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

PARR: The Ravens' strategy already makes more sense than it did in the immediate aftermath of the draft. The void left by Orlando Brown at right tackle was still looming large after GM Eric DeCosta did not spend any of his eight picks on the position, but Baltimore signed Alejandro Villanueva to a two-year deal earlier this week. The consummate smokescreen pro, DeCosta seems to always have a few misdirection plays up his sleeve. He made major investments at the wide receiver position after saying a week earlier that it was "insulting" to see so little respect paid to the team's players at the position. Well done, sir. Oweh will fill the Ravens' biggest need of all if he can put it all together. He didn't post any sacks in his final season at Penn State, but he has the tools to become a highly disruptive force for a defense replacing Matt Judon and Yannick Ngakoue. We loved the Wallace pick in Round 4, and Wade could be a steal if he bounces back from a rough go of it in 2020. This feels like a high-ceiling, low-floor group overall.

Kansas City Chiefs

Grade: B | Total picks: 6

Round 2:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

PARR: Kansas City spent a good chunk of its draft capital to acquire Orlando Brown from the Ravens last month, filling a gaping hole at left tackle. Reminder: We’re not factoring pre-draft trades into the grades in this exercise. So, the Chiefs have a relatively small haul to evaluate, but it's a punchy one. I mean, when Bolton strikes you, it's not going to feel good. He makes the defense better, without question, but the biggest need for the team was defensive end, and there was a good one still on the board in Wake Forest’s Carlos Basham, who went to the Bills a few picks later. Perhaps the Chiefs will eventually be able to unlock the potential of Kaindoh to fill that D-line void, something Florida State was unable to do for the former five-star recruit. The selections we liked the most here were the offensive linemen. Humphrey is an excellent fit for the rebuilt unit, and I expect we’ll be calling Smith, chosen with the third-to-last pick of the sixth round, a steal a few years from now. Powell is a rising talent who could very well outperform his draft slotting, as well. Andy Reid and Brett Veach did a solid job of finding value with their six picks.

Tennessee Titans

Grade: B- | Total picks: 8

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 6:

PARR: To give you an idea of Farley’s talent, he opened draft season as NFL.com analyst Daniel Jeremiah’s No. 5 overall prospect and his highest-ranked defensive player. He has a rare blend of size and skills that had scouts salivating until medical concerns caused his stock to sink late in the process. Jon Robinson was still willing to take a shot at No. 22 amid chatter that the former Hokie would slide to Round 2. If Farley stays healthy, the Titans’ GM will look like a genius. Robinson definitely showed wisdom taking Radunz and Molden, two undervalued prospects who could be Day 1 starters. Unfortunately, the cupboard is looking somewhat bare at wide receiver beyond A.J. Brown after the team waited until Day 3 to address the position. Tight end was a need that went completely unaddressed.

After the draft, troubling news surfaced involving Weaver. The former Panthers defensive lineman was charged with assaulting a woman in Pittsburgh during an incident that occurred on April 18. Weaver’s attorney has called the allegations “completely false and reckless.” The Titans said in a statement that they were not aware of the news until Monday morning. “We obviously take this seriously and are in the process of gathering details and working with the league,” the statement read.

Dallas Cowboys

Grade: B- | Total picks: 11

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

FILICE: Fresh off allowing a franchise-worst 473 points (29.6 per game) in 2020, the Cowboys entered the great college marketplace with a shopping list full of defensive needs. The 'Boys spent their first six picks -- and eight of 11 total -- on defenders. Every sentient being on Planet Earth assumed Dallas would target a corner in Round 1, but after Jaycee Horn and Patrick Surtain II were taken with the two picks immediately preceding the Cowboys' No. 10 slot, Jerry Jones and Co. recalibrated with a quick trade-down before settling on Daniel Jeremiah's No. 12 overall prospect at No. 12 overall. Parsons packs otherworldly athleticism into his 6-3, 246-pound frame, leading many to believe he's one of the true blue-chip players in this draft -- but he's not the best coverage linebacker in this Cowboys class. That's Cox, who could end up being an absolute steal as the kind of three-down 'backer every team covets in today's pass-happy NFL. After winning three FCS national championships as a star at North Dakota State, Cox didn't skip a beat during his grad-transfer season with LSU, as evidenced by his three picks and five pass breakups in 10 SEC games last fall. Wait, though ... Does this mean the Cowboys are hitting reset on the linebacker position? Leighton Vander Esch made the Pro Bowl as a rookie in 2018 and Jaylon Smith earned the honor in '19. But now, Parsons figures to immediately replace one veteran LB, while Cox could steal snaps from the other with his supreme coverage skills. It's obviously notable that Dallas declined Vander Esch's fifth-year option this week. And just two years after signing $64 million extension, Smith could also be in a prove-it year, with the dead money significantly dropping next offseason. Meanwhile, after missing out on the top cornerbacks in Round 1, the Cowboys spent a pair of top-100 picks on the position. The pessimist says they panicked and overdrafted both players. The optimist believes Joseph provides invaluable straight-line speed, while the 6-4 Wright is a scheme-perfect welcoming gift to new defensive coordinator Dan Quinn.

This draft class offers some enticing talent, but it also carries questions in an area that's admittedly difficult to assess from an outside perspective: off-field issues. As covered this week in the Fort-Worth Star Telegram by longtime Cowboys beat writer Clarence Hill Jr., Dallas drafted three players with character concerns, including its first two picks. Parsons was named -- though never charged -- in a civil hazing lawsuit brought by a former Penn State player against the university. The linebacker states that he was falsely accused. Joseph, who transferred to Kentucky after being suspended by LSU for violating team rules, says he told the Cowboys "everything" during the pre-draft process. Ball began his career Florida State, but he was suspended by the university following accusations of dating violence and eventually wound up at Marshall. "I believe in second chances," Jerry Jones said in the wake of the draft. "I believe in people learning from their mistakes. That is what part of the game is about. You get knocked down and get back up. That philosophy held very true here with Ball and anybody else we drafted. If that individual has a real good opportunity with some redeeming things in his life, then I offset."

Buffalo Bills

Grade: B- | Total picks: 8

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

PARR: GM Brandon Beane isn’t going to rest until he has a championship-caliber defensive line. The Bills have now spent their top draft pick on D-linemen in each of the last three years, but they haven’t yet seen the results they were hoping for out of Ed Oliver (ninth overall pick in 2019) and A.J. Epenesa (54th overall pick in 2020). After those experiences, they were willing to gamble in Round 1 on Rousseau, who has some boom-or-bust qualities. It will be interesting to see how much he’s used inside, where he made a lot of his hay in his one year of production at Miami. I would have diversified a bit more early on -- addressing needs like cornerback, running back and tight end -- but the Bills took a double-down approach off the edge and at offensive tackle. Basham was getting buzz as a potential surprise first-rounder last week, so finding him at Pick 61 was a nice value. The new twin towers at tackle (Brown 6-foot-8, 311 pounds; Doyle 6-6, 320) are intriguing, with Brown’s upside particularly tantalizing. This draft class might require some patience, but Buffalo is in position to provide it with a roster that was already built to win now.

New England Patriots

Grade: B- | Total picks: 8

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

PARR: I would have been in favor of the Patriots, coming off an aggressive free agency period, staying on the attack and trading up to land Justin Fields, since I think the drop-off between him and Jones is significant. Instead, the Bears moved up to No. 11 to crown the former Ohio State QB as their new savior, while New England stayed put. Perhaps Jones is a perfect fit as an accurate pocket passer who can efficiently execute Josh McDaniels’ offense, but to slightly alter a quote from another famous MJ, the ceiling doesn’t seem like the roof here. Bill Belichick ended up taking Daniel Jeremiah’s 32nd-ranked prospect with the 15th overall pick. The Patriots found better value later, adding Barmore and Perkins to upgrade the defensive line. Perkins, Jeremiah’s No. 44 prospect, fell into the team’s lap at No. 96, and Barmore showed he could be a dominant force down the stretch last season. However, New England didn’t pick a WR until the final round and failed to address its need for a cornerback. Nixon could be a guy who outperforms his draft slotting, though, and I look forward to watching Stevenson’s formidable brand of power football at the next level.

Green Bay Packers

Grade: B- | Total picks: 9

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

FILICE: The biggest story of the NFL offseason broke hours before the draft began, and it dropped on Green Bay like a megaton bomb: Aaron Rodgers is not pleased with the Packers. NFL Network Insider Ian Rapoport said the reigning NFL MVP is unhappy with the status of ongoing contract negotiations. ESPN's Adam Schefter reported the quarterback doesn't want to take another snap in Titletown. And then former Bronco/current radio host Mark Schlereth basically put Rodgers on a plane to Denver to begin house-hunting. It was a dizzying Thursday afternoon. And it hasn't really slowed down in the days since, with Green Bay icon Brett Favre providing his foreboding two cents and venerable Packers beat writer Bob McGinn reporting that Rodgers calls GM Brian Gutekunst "Jerry Krause" behind his back. I feel for you, Packer Backers. I imagine every cell phone buzz instantly sends a chill down your spine that it could be The Trade Alert. So I'm here to give you want you need: One hundred and thirty-seven words of uninterrupted draft analysis where the only A-Rodge discussed is Amari:

Stokes is an absolute burner with good size, but his unrefined technique feels a little Kevin Kingy. While the corner was selected with the No. 29 pick, NFL.com draft guru Daniel Jeremiah had him ranked as the No. 50 overall prospect. On the plus side, DJ ranked Myers at No. 57 overall. And it's fitting that, in the wake of All-Pro center Corey Linsley's free agency departure, Green Bay went back to the Buckeye well for another pivot. Rodgers -- Amari! Not the other guy ... -- is a dense, physical slot with playmaking ability. He's also the son of Tee Martin, who was Randall Cobb's position coach at Kentucky. And Cobb says Rodgers is "a lot better" version of himself. The 212-pounder's definitely a YAC monster, with a running back build and a nasty stiff arm.

Seattle Seahawks

Grade: B- | Total picks: 3

Round 2:

Round 4:

Round 6:

FILICE: Seattle made the fewest selections in this draft, but John Schneider, Pete Carroll and Co. landed three intriguing prospects at three areas of need. The 5-foot-9 Eskridge primarily lined up out wide at Western Michigan -- embarrassing outclassed MAC cornerbacks to the tune of 33 receptions for 768 yards (23.3 yards per catch!) and eight touchdowns in just six games -- but he figures to spend most of his time in the slot with Seattle. Putting his electric 4.39 speed between DK Metcalf and Tyler Lockett is heady stuff. Draft ageists will dwell on the fact that he's entering the league at age 24, but the old man cooked all comers during Senior Bowl week. Brown, a fourth-round CB selection, is also a bit small for his position, but he plays much bigger than 5-9 3/4, routinely bullying opposing receivers of all shapes and sizes. And he's plenty battle-tested, as a three-year starter in the pass-happy Big 12. No wonder Carroll told reporters that the 'Hawks "didn't draft him as a nickel," planning to start the rookie off outside, measuring tape be damned. Forsythe could end up being the steal of this group, though. Projected by many as a Day 2 pick, the Florida tackle fell into Seattle's lap in the back half of Round 6. Standing 6-foot-8, Forsythe predictably struggles with leverage in the run game, but he uses length and strong hands to swallow up edge rushers. Just ask Azeez Ojulari, who disappeared into Forsythe's pterodactyl wingspan for an entire Saturday last November.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Grade: B- | Total picks: 7

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 7:

FILICE: What do you get for the team that has everything? As you probably heard (... five times in the past 12 minutes), the defending Super Bowl champions are returning all 22 starters. So the pre-draft NEEDS checklist was kind of an exercise in semantics. But with Jason Pierre-Paul in the final year of his contract, edge rusher felt like as big a "need" as Tampa had, and the Bucs addressed it immediately by making Tryon with the last pick of the first round. The U-Dub product's a tough evaluation, as he opted out of the 2020 season, which would've been his second year as a full-time starter. Apparently, though, he cleaned up his diet, further enhancing a lengthy frame that was made for edge rushing. Bucs fans are undoubtedly eager to take the updated model out for a spin, but the pick made sense from a relative need and fit perspective. I can't say the same about Tampa's second-round selection. Athleticism definitely isn't Trask's bag, which is fine -- that's not Bruce Arians' type. But the Florida quarterback also isn't known for the kind of arm strength demanded in Arians' "No risk it, no biscuit" system. Clearly, Trask wasn't drafted to contribute in this year's repeat attempt, but does his long-term potential in this offense really merit a second-round pick? Hainsey, on the other hand, seems like a savvy depth addition who could back up multiple positions in a pinch. Darden's another sensible middle-round pick. As a nightmare to corral in the open field and a home run threat over the top, the North Texas product adds an electric element to the receiving corps. Oh, and he's comin' in hot with the No. 1 jersey. Gotta like the chutzpah there.

Houston Texans

Grade: B- | Total picks: 5

Round 3:

Round 5:

Round 6:

PARR: Nick Caserio came away with a respectable, albeit small, class in his first draft as general manager. Houston was without a pick in the first two rounds (former head coach/GM Bill O’Brien sent those selections to Miami in the Laremy Tunsil trade), so Caserio was working with very limited capital. He added further insurance behind Deshaun Watson, whose future remains murky, with his first pick. Mills has just 11 collegiate starts under his belt after injuries plagued him during his Stanford career, so there’s some significant risk here. His ceiling is as high as any quarterback picked outside the first round this year, though. The Texans filled one of their biggest needs by trading up for Collins, who gives the team the size (6-foot-4) it lacked at the position, and Jordan was a great value in Round 5. The former Hurricanes tight end isn’t going to wow anyone with his athletic testing, but that’s not going to stop him from becoming a trusted target for whoever is under center. There were some needs Caserio never addressed, but that’s not a surprising result given the circumstances he inherited.

Arizona Cardinals

Grade: C+ | Total picks: 7

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 4:

Round 6:

Round 7:

FILICE: When it comes to talent evaluation, Steve Keim has a type, and that type is sexy. The Cardinals general manager clearly likes making flashy draft picks, sometimes to the detriment of need and positional value. Take Collins for example. The 6-5, 259-pound linebacker combines old-school bulk with new-school athleticism. Shoot, the man won a game last season with a 96-yard walk-off pick-six. And when Keim called to inform Collins the Cardinals were drafting him, the 'backer excitedly told his new boss, "Steve ... We're gonna f------ kill everyone." What's not to like?! And the thought of lining Collins up alongside last year's first-round hybrid haul, LB Isaiah Simmons, is admittedly exhilarating from a positionless-football standpoint. But is this the best use of draft resources for a team that's looking to make the step from playoff contender to playoff participant? Keim did address bigger needs with his next two picks, but he did so in fitting fashion: scooping up a pair of dynamic athletes with major question marks. Moore torched the Big Ten as a true freshman back in 2018, but he hasn't been the same player since, struggling with injuries along the way. And his pro day height measurement -- 5-7 flat, two inches below his listing at Purdue -- spawned additional uncertainty about what role he'll play in the NFL. Like Moore, Wilson exploded onto the scene with a stellar true freshman season. Also like Moore, Wilson failed to recapture that magic for the remainder of his college career. He's a freak athlete, though, with pro day numbers that pop off the page (4.34 40-yard dash, 43 1/2-inch vertical leap, 11-4 broad jump, 26 bench reps). Keim has a type, for better or worse.

Indianapolis Colts

Grade: C+ | Total picks: 7

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 4:

Round 5:

Round 6:

Round 7:

PARR: We were digging how the draft started for the Colts. They found their edge rusher in Round 1, and we assumed that meant the left tackle replacement for Anthony Castonzo was coming in Round 2. But it didn’t arrive in the second round. In fact, GM Chris Ballard didn’t pick an offensive lineman until late in Round 7. Maybe Ballard has a plan for the position that hasn’t yet surfaced, but the idea of welcoming Carson Wentz to Indianapolis with Sam Tevi and Julie’n Davenport as the top left tackles on the depth chart isn’t a plan we endorse. Now, there’s plenty to like about Paye’s explosiveness and upside, even though he produced just 11.5 sacks in four years at Michigan. Doubling down off the edge was an interesting choice, with Odeyingbo coming off the Achilles injury he suffered in January. He’s another pass rusher who could develop into a quality starter down the road. Granson and Strachan are intriguing talents, too, but this draft felt a bit reach-y after Round 1. The Colts only landed two of NFL.com analyst Daniel Jeremiah’s top 150 prospects, and one of them might need a redshirt year in 2021. 

Sours: https://www.nfl.com/news/2021-nfl-draft-class-rankings-bears-chargers-jets-top-the-board

Now discussing:

NFL Draft analyst Mel Kiper Jr. has very interesting top-10 rankings

Mel Kiper Jr. recently released his top-10 prospect rankings for the 2022 NFL Draft. Here’s why some of his choices are a bit head-scratching. 

Mel Kiper Jr.’s latest big board is out, and some of his rankings might catch you off guard. Though we are still seven months away from the 2022 NFL Draft, you may already be familiar with some of the top consensus prospects entering the new season.

For the most part, these are all prospects that draft analysts believe have earned first-round consideration. Kiper doesn’t necessarily agree. On Thursday, the long-time NFL Draft expert released a video detailing his top-10 prospects in the 2022 draft. Here’s who he has at the top:

Kiper went strongly against popular opinion here. Not only does he not have a single quarterback inside his top 10, but he also elected to have three receivers among his best overall players.

Should we trust Mel Kiper’s NFL Draft board?

Mel Kiper has been in the business for a long time. However, that doesn’t mean that he’s immune to getting a few things wrong. There are lots of disagreements this time of year, and there is still much of the 2022 season that needs to be played and hundreds of hours of tape that needs to be analyzed before we can properly assess all of these players.

However, I can’t say that I’m on board with Kiper’s rankings… At least, not at this point in time.

In what I consider to be a notably poor wide receiver class, I find it very interesting that Kiper elected to have a trio of receivers crack his top-10 list. Jahan Dotson, Garrett Wilson, and Drake London are all solid football players, but I’m not sure if there’s another analyst out there who would be bold enough to have all three ranked this high based on what we’ve seen. Some don’t even have Wilson as the best receiver on his own team, as Ohio State’s Chris Olave — Wilson’s teammate — is considered by many to be the best of this group.

In addition to including three receivers that some have as low as second or even third-round grades on, Kiper also excludes any of the top quarterbacks from his rankings. While he does make mention of players like Liberty’s Malik Willis and Oklahoma’s Spencer Rattler, neither were deemed good enough prospects to find their way inside the top 10.

Mel Kiper is a well-respected NFL Draft analyst, and perhaps he will be proven right in time. However, his top rankings have other draft nerds (myself included) questioning some of his decisions with his draft board. Either way, these players are worth keeping an eye on to see where they will wind up going next April.

Sours: https://withthefirstpick.com/2021/10/01/nfl-draft-analyst-mel-kiper-jr-interesting/


333 334 335 336 337