J 200 gibson guitar

J 200 gibson guitar DEFAULT

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The King of the Flat-tops

The Gibson SJ is the world's most famous acoustic guitar and earned its designation as the "King of the Flat-Tops." Since its release in , its wide use by American artists has made the Super Jumbo one of the most widely played acoustic guitars of our time. The most striking features of the new SJ Original include the carved four bar Moustache bridge, an engraved tortoise pickguard, mother-of-pearl crown fretboard and headstock inlay, and exquisite flamed maple back and sides. The SJ is an American original with its shape and elegant appearance.

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AuthorTopic:  The Gibson J (Dylan/Harrison/Lennon, etc).

Chris LeDrew



From:
Canada
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Keith Currie


 


From:
Shellbrook, Saskatchewan, Canada
Post Posted 19 Feb pm    
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I have a J with that tunable bridge and I wish it didnt, Iam sure the original ones had lots better tone. I know my J puts it to shame for sound.
Keith
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Chris LeDrew



From:
Canada
Post Posted 20 Feb am    
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Yes, Keith I had a '67 and it was largely a dud. I got rid of it. I'd love to have a '50s or even a good reissue. Just the feel of a J body alone justifies having one.
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Keith Currie


 


From:
Shellbrook, Saskatchewan, Canada
Post Posted 20 Feb am    
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Yes I know what you mean Chris, I have thought of changing the bridge on mine bur havent. Trouble is I have a D 28 Martin which I like better then both of the Gibson's so so thats what I play . As I said though I do like my old J
Keith
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Chris LeDrew



From:
Canada
Post Posted 20 Feb am    
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I changed out the saddle on mine but it made little difference. There is a block underneath the bridge as well that many removed in an effort to improve tone. By the late '60s Gibson acoustics were entering a dark period. My '62 Southern Jumbo is a canon. No comparison to anything they made in the Norlin era.
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Keith Currie


 


From:
Shellbrook, Saskatchewan, Canada
Post Posted 20 Feb am    
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Yep I hear you , My J is like that, all most as loud and proud as the D
Keith
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Joachim Kettner



From:
Germany
Post Posted 20 Feb pm    
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I just can't imagine what the reason is, that the quality of sound differs so strongly. One explanation for me would be, that the thickness of the wood, especially that of the top, the shape and dimensions of the braces and their placement under the top had been altered in this period. Maybe a different kind of laquer was used?
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Chris LeDrew



From:
Canada
Post Posted 21 Feb pm    
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I think the construction was getting shoddy in general from Norlin's takeover and the subsequent assembly-line production that was starting to kick in during this period. The neck on my '67 J was basically a skinny Les Paul neck. There was no real substance to it. Along with the heavy weight of the body, it amounted to a dud. The earlier '60s guitars and older were lighter and more resonant for sure.

Having said all this, some of the most famous acoustic intros in rock history were done on these "crappy" late '60s Js: "Pinball Wizard" and "Behind Blue Eyes" by the Who, the Beatles' "Here Comes the Sun" and "Guitar Gently Weeps," Led Zeppelin's "Ramble On" and "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You," and many more. In fact, mine recorded VERY WELL. There was a tightness and natural compression to it that the mic loved. I hear this quality in the above hits. I always play the intro to "Pinball Wizard" when I pick up a J
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Marc Jenkins



From:
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Post Posted 21 Feb pm    
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In a Fretboard Journal interview, Larry Cragg said that Neil Young's J is so quiet you can barely hear it. But, before taking it out on the road or to recording, Cragg would use some sort of vibrating device (specifics withheld) applied to the top and bridge. Apparently, it would wake up and really sing!
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Roger Rettig



From:
Naples, FL
Post Posted 23 Feb am    
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If I'm completely honest then my love of Js has much more to do with their aesthetics than it does with their performance. Then there's that association with Elvis Presley (plenty of J footage in his early films!) and, of course, the Everly Brothers - if you're anything like my age, those are the guys who held sway over the pop music world long before the Beatles.

Raptly gazing at their guitars was all a part of the magic!

I had a new one in (sunburst with the Tunomatic bridge); I bought it to make a 'pair' with my Gibson Super but it really wasn't a calculated choice based on its quality. I disliked its slender neck (as referenced above) and always felt that its good looks far outweighed its sonic qualities!

I traded that for a '64 Gibson Everly Brothers model which was even worse! I don't know where either opf them are now.

In I bought a blond from Gruhn's in Nashville - a much better guitar with a nice chunky neck that filled my hand well. I sold it a few years later as the money I was offered for in (in London) was obscene! An offer I 'couldn't refuse'!

I was recently drawn back into the J fold when I bought an '06 reissue - as we know Gibson have vastly impoved many aspects of their operation since the fateful Norlin days and these Js - if mine's anything to go by - are as good as any that have ever been made.

My favourite luthier, however, remains unconvinced - he did some tweaking for me and, as he worked, he looked wistfully at my new guitar and said:

"They promise so much, and yet, and yet"

I still love to stand in front of the mirror with mine, though.

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Chris LeDrew



From:
Canada
Post Posted 23 Feb am    
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Roger that is a beautiful guitar. A lot of techs expect to get a big boom out of a narrow-waisted jumbo when in fact they were never meant produce a big sound like the slope shoulders. Here is a Gibson piece that may interest J lovers:

http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Lifestyle/Features/gibson-jfacts/

Below an except from the article that sums up what Roger is saying about the sound. Townshend and other aggressive palyers sem to like the relatively dead sound of the J because it allowed them to play more dyanmically:

A Gibson J was the defining acoustic sound of The Who�s Pete Townshend. He wrote �Pinball Wizard� on his J, which starred on most all recordings beginning with The Who�s Tommy album. �I picked it out from about five at Manny�s in New York in ,� Townshend told Gibson.com. � It had a crisp sound and an easy neck. It was only later I found how well the J records when you play it hard. Like the Everly acoustic, it has a rather dead soundboard and that allows you to really dig in when strumming. They are hard to bring to life with piezo pickups because the sound is so distinctive in real air, but the body shape, the necks and the sheer strength of the guitar are all very important to me. They also look utterly beautiful.�

Many also consider it the perfect singer's guitar because the sound is small and focused, as to not drown out the voice.
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Chris LeDrew



From:
Canada
Post Posted 23 Feb am     More on the Dylan/Harrison Guitar
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The same article states the following, and asks the same question we were wondering on the Beatles article in Steel Players:

What�s that guitar pictured on the album cover of Bob Dylan�s Nashville Skyline? It�s Dylan�s J Dylan was given the guitar by The Beatles� George Harrison. Dylan played the guitar live at �s Isle of Wight festival in the U.K. The Beatles� George Harrison himself was keen a fan of the J � he �upgraded� from the Epiphone acoustics he previously favored to record The Beatles, a.k.a. �The White Album.� �For You Blue,� �Here Comes the Sun,� �While My Guitar Gently Weeps�, �Long, Long, Long� and �Piggies� all feature Harrison playing one of his Gibson Js. Harrison also composed most songs for his solo debut, All Things Must Pass, on a Gibson J Was this the very same guitar given to Dylan, and later given back? Fab Four fanatics, let us know the truth!
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Bill Hatcher


 


From:
Atlanta Ga. USA
Post Posted 23 Feb am    
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as roger said concerning the sonicness of them. i always thought they sounded thuddy.

i once had a 60s gibson hummingbird in for repair. finish was just awful and the customer wanted it redone. you would not believe the thickness of the original gibson finish. i was shocked when stripping it off!! just globs and globs of it. that guitar came to life with a new thinner lacquer finish. it sounded better than any gibson flat top from that era that i have ever heard.

anyone ever play the j gibsons that were rosewood?? seems the very first ones were. probably went to maple because of the cost of the big back and sides in rwood.
ok..looked them up on google. wow! http://www.vintageguitar.com//gibson-jrosewood/

and here is a new rosewood custom shop model

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/gibson-sjrosewood-custom-acoustic-electric-guitar
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Keith Currie


 


From:
Shellbrook, Saskatchewan, Canada
Post Posted 23 Feb am    
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Keith Currie


 


From:
Shellbrook, Saskatchewan, Canada
Post Posted 23 Feb am    
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Tried to post a pix of my old J but it didnt work.
Keith
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Keith Currie


 


From:
Shellbrook, Saskatchewan, Canada
Post Posted 23 Feb am    
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Roger Rettig



From:
Naples, FL
Post Posted 23 Feb am    
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As much as that J of mine is a little 'thuddy' (good word) and can't hold a candle to any of my Martins, especially my '53 , I'd save the Gibson in a fire!!!!

The picture above expresses more than I can - it's a guitar of such stunning beauty that any sonic shortcomings (there aren't many with this one!) fade into insignificance!
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Roger Rettig



From:
Naples, FL
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Keith Currie


 


From:
Shellbrook, Saskatchewan, Canada
Post Posted 23 Feb pm    
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Roger those are fine looking s for sure, Mine plays very nice but I cant seem to get past my D Martin because of the tone even though it doesnt have a lot of beauty in appearance.
Keith
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b0b



From:
Cloverdale, CA, USA
Post Posted 23 Feb pm    
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They are pretty, but they look like they would sound boomy and feed back easily on stage. Am I correct?
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Roger Rettig



From:
Naples, FL
Post Posted 23 Feb pm    
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Yes, b0b - if I want to use it 'ive' (the '06 sunburst) I need to install one of those soundhole 'fillers' - then I have a problem because that obscures the volume-control that's inside the sound-hole.

If I have to use an acoustic, this is my go-to guitar; not my very best Martin, but I've never had any feed-back issues with the Thin-Line pick-up with tone/volume controls (again: soundhole mounted).

Martin Custom Shop H - apart from a too-shallow neck-profile, this is a lovely guitar; the (used to be called 'M') is my favourite Martin body.


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Joachim Kettner



From:
Germany
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David Mason



From:
Cambridge, MD, USA
Post Posted 25 Mar am    
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No one sound can be "best" when people are looking for widely different purposes. A focused, compressed, "narrow" sound may fit one type of music better that a huge boomy sound, flatpickers and fingerpickers need different guitars the same thing holds true with electrics. The guitars that sounds "best" straight into a Twin Reverb tend to be the lighter, "woodier" ones with low-output pickups, if you're playing music with more effects and overdrive that woody sound will drive you nuts with it's erratic frequency curve. It seems like people knew this better 30 years ago and we get dumber as we insist on the one single best of the best.
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Roger Rettig



From:
Naples, FL
Post Posted 25 Mar am    
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Ha! I forgot that Cliff has had a few of these guitars over the years.

For any collectors of useless minutia out there, it's Cliff's sunburst J (not the one in the video)that can be heard in the hands of Shadows' rhythm guitarist Bruce Welch on their huge hit record, 'Apache'. Cliff was in the studio (Abbey Road) and contributed some percussion to the track but they were unhappy with the rhythm part on a Fender electric so Bruce borrowed the Gibson.

Next thing you knew, Cliff Richard had been knocked out of the #1 slot in the charts by his own backing group!
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Joachim Kettner



From:
Germany
Post Posted 25 Mar am    
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I didn't know that Cliff Richard even played guitar before I saw this clip. That's an interesting little story about the Apache song, Roger!
I think the rhythm part in this song, is actually harder to play than the solo.
I can also hear this kind of fast strums in the Moody Blues' song "Questions".

Btw, Greg Lake used this guitar on "Lucky Man".


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Sours: https://bb.steelguitarforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=&sid=5fbb22b0f2ee4e2cba8e10fc8f
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Gibson J Standard Acoustic-Electric Guitar

MSRP: $4,

Now entering its 76th year, the Gibson J &#; the &#;King of the Flat-tops&#; &#; is as much of a legend as ever. The current crop of Js, made in Gibson&#;s Bozeman, Montana shop, is helping the company keep pace with a lot of stiff competition in the guitar industry these days.

The J has long been a favorite of professionals, used by early guitar stars like Gene Autry and Roy Rogers, as well as more modern legends like Jimmy Page and The Edge. The guitar doesn&#;t sound like a Martin or a Taylor, but then, they don&#;t sound like this Gibson. The new J we played presented excellent craftsmanship, the result of Gibson&#;s strict inspection regimen. With superbly even balance and tone, the guitar fretted like a dream all the way up the neck, and unplugged barre chords sustained forever, almost as long as open ones.

The guitar is gorgeous both sonically and aesthetically, featuring the old Gibson crown peghead logo (sometimes called the &#;thistle&#; logo), which has since been used on the pegheads of many Gibson models. The tortoise pickguard is Gibson’s standard Super Jumbo shape with the traditional floral and vine design, and the guitar has the love-it-or-hate-it moustache bridge. The J comes with built-in Fishman Ellipse Aura electronics, with a switch for selecting four tonal images. The controls are pretty convenient, just inside the top of the soundhole, but working the several switches can take some practice unless you find just one tone combination you like and stick with it, adjusting your tone with the controls on the PA or amp as needed.

Older Js are in high demand, especially ones from the days when the guitar was typically called the Super Jumbo, and ones made before the Norlin years when many Gibson products went south. Since new ownership took over in the s, the quality of all Gibson products has improved, and the company is staying as viable as any guitar maker out there because of the craftsmanship on guitars like this one.

List price for this axe is $4,, but it can easily be had for more than a thousand dollars less. Whether you buy one or not, you owe it to yourself to try one out, as this is one cool historical guitar. With its new Js, Gibson is continuing to hold its rightful place as one of the great guitar makers.

Sours: https://americansongwriter.com/review-gibson-jstandard-acoustic-electric-guitar/
Gibson SJ-200 Standard Demo \u0026 Review

image

All Hail the King!

The Epiphone Inspired by Gibson™ J™ is a stunning homage to the King of the Flat-Tops - the world-famous Gibson™ SJ Since its introduction in it has been the choice of "singing cowboys" like Tex Ritter and Gene Autry, as well as folk, rock and country royalty, including Emmylou Harris, Elvis, Jimmy Page, Bob Dylan, George Harrison, The Edge, and many more. Featuring a Super Jumbo non-cutaway solid figured maple body, solid Sitka spruce top, and two-piece maple neck with a mahogany center strip, the Epiphone J is built with all solid woods for outstanding tone. The visual elements have always been a big part of the J's appeal, and the Epiphone Inspired by Gibson J includes a Moustache™ bridge with curved block inlays, Crown headstock inlay and Graduated Crown mother of pearl fingerboard inlays, and a J style pickguard with two-color graphics. Available in Aged Antique Natural Gloss and Aged Vintage Sunburst Gloss finishes.
A battery is not included. To power your pickup, you will need a 9-volt battery.

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Sours: https://www.epiphone.com/Guitar/EPIWYA96/J/Aged-Antique-Natural-Gloss

Guitar gibson j 200

Pete&#;s Gear: Gibson J Jumbo acoustic guitars

J

Pete Townshend began using &#; and continues to use &#; Gibson J jumbo acoustic guitars on stage for Who and solo performances beginning in , with the Quadrophenia shows. In he used one of these guitars on Endless Wire.

Pete chose the J to match the sound and performance of his beloved sunburst Gibson J, which he acquired new from Manny&#;s in and used in virtually every recording from &#;s Tommy to &#;s Iron Man.

The first Who shows in saw Pete playing acoustic on stage exclusively. In late and he would begin using Fender Eric Clapton Stratocasters fitted with Fishman piezo electronics, to simulate the acoustic sound, switching back and forth between the acoustics and electrics depending on the number.

Selected quotes

All quotes and references are copyright their original owners and are included for reference only.

Pete, on his guitar sound in

&#;I hope that prior to the tour I didn&#;t raise fan&#;s hopes that I was going to play electric all the way through the show. In fact at the first dates, and even later in the electric Love Reign O&#;er Me, there was a bit of an illusion going on. Although I was holding a Stratocaster all the way through the first two dates in the USA it was heavily modified. I was actually playing via an acoustic transducer fitted into the guitar which produced a rhythm sound very close to my white Gibson J I only used the electric channel a few times in the set.&#;

&#;The lead v. acoustic thing is not just about my hearing, my intransigence, my fear of spearing myself or my musical preferences, it is not just about &#;Pete.&#; It is about musical and presentational dynamics as well. Remember that I write mainly on acoustic guitar. A lot of the songs from Quadrophenia, like a lot of Who songs, sound best when I play acoustic. Ideally I&#;d like to play acoustic and electric at the same time on stage. Simon did a fantastic job on electric and covered me very well. I settled for what I think all Who fans would have wished &#; the best mix.&#;

From May 17, , Gibson Guitars interview: Js, regrets over smashed guitars, The Who &#;Then and Now&#; and more: Q&A with Pete Townshend

What&#;s the story on your original J? What is it about a J that makes it so essential to you?

I picked it out from about five at Manny&#;s in New York. It had a crisp sound and an easy neck. It was only later I found how well the J records when you play it hard. Like the Everly acoustic, it has a rather dead soundboard and that allows you to really dig in when strumming. They are hard to bring to life with piezo pickups because the sound is so distinctive in real air, but the body shape, the necks and the sheer strength of the guitar are all very important to me. They also look utterly beautiful.

Gibson news release regarding Gibson SJ for Quadrophenia tour

Who plays Gibson? Well the Who

Last Saturday, July 19th [], Gibson Artist Rep. Tim Bolin presented Pete Townsend [sic] a Fishman Matrix-equipped J acoustic guitar. This guitar will be put into rotation with two other J used by Townsend and Roger Daltry [sic] on the Who&#;s current &#;Quadrophenia&#; tour. In fact, the J is the only acoustic guitar used on this tour.

From September , 20th Century Guitars interview: The Music Must Change

Could you say something about the Pete Townshend J limited guitar that Gibson recently introduced? The Pete Townshend signature model has a lighter neck contour. How involved were you in designing the new J signature?

I did a lot of work on the neck. My very first J seemed to have a thinner neck.

What originally attracted you to the Gibson Super Jumbo ? I know that Elvis, Dylan and Ron Wood used it.

It records so well. It has quite a crisp sound for such a large guitar, and my first one (now in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum) actually had a metal tunamatic [sic] bridge. I may try this on a variant of my signature model.

From Acoustic magazine interview:

I understand your favourite acoustic guitar is the Gibson J Have you always played Gibson guitars? Do you play any other acoustics other than the J?

My first good guitar was an acoustic made in Prague. Later I bought a Harmony string that became my staple. I was a huge fan of Leadbelly, and the Harmony was as close as I could get to his big Stella. Today I like Fylde guitars. I also use a lot of Collings. They seem to make guitars today the way they were once made by Martin. I have several because I like to keep a number of open tunings going, so when I pick up a guitar and start to fiddle around I might discover something new. Onstage I love the sturdiness and visual beauty of the Gibson J

Regarding playing acoustic with a loud rock band, what gear do you use? Pickups? Amps and/or monitors, etc.?

I have some Collings guitars that have built-in piezos; I imagine they are basic Fishman. On my stage guitars, I use Gibson Js and they have Fishman piezos that are complemented by a small microphone inside the guitar. That is my favourite right now. I use a tube preamp, a Summit compressor, and then on to the desk. I listen through earphones onstage usually when I play acoustic.

Features

The Gibson J Jumbo features:

  • Solid Sitka spruce top, with Eastern flamed maple back and sides, multiple bound.
  • Single-bound rosewood fingerboard with Mother of Pearl Crown inlays; 25½&#; scale.
  • Rosewood &#;open&#; moustache bridge with partial Mother of Pearl inlay.
  • Pickguard with Mother of Pearl dot inlay and engraved flowers.
  • Antique Natural Lacquer finish.

Pete had these guitars fitted with Fishman Acoustic Matrix pickup systems for use &#; For , he had the Gibson Js fitted with Fishman Ellipse Matrix Blend pickup system, which can be identified by their characteristic round control panel inside the soundhole, and gooseneck microphone.

In &#;, these guitars were fed via Shure Wireless System MESA/Boogie Studio preamps, which then went into Demeter direct box into PA. Beginning in , he used wired guitar cable to the direct box to the PA.

Since , the signal path includes a Summit compressor in addition to the preamp.

Alan Rogan, Pete&#;s guitar tech, numbers these guitars with small black-on-white stickers to identify capo settings/tunings, a la the original Les Paul Deluxe numbering. The stickers are typically placed on the treble bout above the neck joint.

For strings, Pete typically uses D&#;Addario or &#; strings.

Signature SJ model

In February , Gibson issued a Gibson Pete Townshend SJ Limited in commemoration of Pete&#;s original Gibson J In , Pete used these guitars on stage, fitted with a Fishman Ellipse Matrix Blend pickup system.

Photo Gallery

 Playing Gibson J, in front of four rack-mounted channel-switching MESA/Boogie Studio preamps (one for electrics, one for acoustics, two for backup spares), which fed into Demeter direct boxes into onstage mixing console, fed to PA and to wedge monitor.

Playing Gibson J, in front of four rack-mounted channel-switching MESA/Boogie Studio preamps (one for electrics, one for acoustics, two for backup spares), which fed into Demeter direct boxes into onstage mixing console, fed to PA and to wedge monitor.

Ca. , wearing headphones (to protect from feedback through monitors) with Gibson Signature SJ equipped with Fishman Ellipse Matrix Blend pickup system.

Ca. , wearing headphones (to protect from feedback through monitors) with Gibson Signature SJ equipped with Fishman Ellipse Matrix Blend pickup system.

Click to view larger version (kb) Fishman trade ad, courtesy Mark Herman, showing Fishman Ellipse Matrix Blend in Gibson Signature SJ

Click to view larger version (kb) Fishman trade ad, courtesy Mark Herman, showing Fishman Ellipse Matrix Blend in Gibson Signature SJ

Ca. , early use of a blonde J with solid moustache bridge, miming for Let My Love Open The Door video.

Ca. , a blonde J, with a solid moustache bridge, with two Collings at right, and a mandolin. Photo courtesy Kenny F.

Two blonde Gibson Js &#; display at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas

Two Gibson J acoustic guitars (one intact and one broken on Late Night with Dave Letterman, )

Photos courtesy Michael Mullins.

Click to view larger version. Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas display, ca.
Click to view larger version. Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas display, ca.

Click images to view larger versions.Courtesy Michael Mullins.

Resources and Information

Links

Sours: https://www.thewho.net/whotabs/gear/guitar/gibsonsjhtml
Acoustic Paradiso - Gibson J-100 and J-200 Comparison

Gibson J

The Gibson SJ (Super Jumbo ), commonly known as the J, is an acoustic guitar model produced by the Gibson Guitar Corporation.

History[edit]

Gibson entered into production of this model in as its top-of-the-line flat top guitar, initially called the Super Jumbo, changing the name in to the Super Jumbo It replaced the Gibson Advanced Jumbo. It was made at the Gibson Factory in Kalamazoo, Michigan. The SJ was named for its super-large 16 7/8" flat top body, with a double-braced red spruce top, rosewood back and sides, and sunburst finish. In the materials used for the guitar changed to maple back and sides. Gibson changed the name to the J in Due to the weak post-depression economy and wartime austerity, demand for this high-end guitar was very limited and production quantities were small. Early models made from rosewood are highly prized by collectors.

Current models[edit]

Gibson currently makes many variations of the J

The SJ Studio is the lowest model in the line, featuring walnut rather than maple back and sides, chrome hardware, a plain pickguard, natural finish and no fingerboard binding, but it retains the inlays and electronics of the SJ Standard. It has at times been discontinued.

The SJ Standard is available in sunburst and natural, featuring LR Baggs electronics, gold hardware, Grover tuners, figured maple back and sides and a three-piece laminate neck (maple/rosewood/maple). It also has a rosewood fingerboard and bridge, an engraved pickguard, and mother-of-pearl crown inlays.

The SJ Custom is a high-end model, featuring rosewood back and sides (like the original SJs from the s), a rosewood fingerboard and bridge, gold hardware, Grover Imperial tuners, LR Baggs electronics, an upgraded case, the same three-piece neck as the Standard and Studio, abalone inlays, an engraved pickguard, an older, script-style Gibson logo, and a 'four ribbon bridge' instead of the Standard's 'two ribbon' bridge.

Along with these three are two reissues, the True Vintage (based on the s construction) and the Western Classic Prewar , which is similar in specifications to the original early models (rosewood back and sides, ebony fingerboard, block inlays). Gibson also does limited run models, such as the J Koa, the J Trophy, and Montana Gold.

Gibson's brand, Epiphone, produces a more affordable version of the J As of , Epiphone released a new "Inspired by Gibson" model of the J, which brings the character and specifications of the Gibson model to a wider market. It currently retails for $ and comes in two colors - Aged Vintage Sunburst and Aged Natural Antique. [2]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibson_J

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